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CHEM203: Bioinorganic Chemistry

Unit 6: Oxygen Transport And Transfer   Oxygen is essential to many life forms, including human life.  Many human-body functions at the cellular level require oxygen; accordingly, oxygen must be transported through the body and transferred to the biological entity that requires it.  In this unit, you will learn about the metal centers in the activation sites of proteins that are involved in the transport and transfer of oxygen in the human body.

Unit 6 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 9.5 hours to complete.
 
☐    Subunit 6.1: 8 hours

☐    Subunit 6.2: 0.5 hour

☐    Subunit 6.3: 0.5 hour

☐    Subunit 6.4: 0.5 hour

Unit6 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student should be able to:
- Describe the basic mechanism of assisted oxygen transport into and removal of carbon dioxide from the human body. - Explain what is meant by cooperativity and how it assists in dioxygen transport in biological systems. - Compare and contrast the heme families in terms of oxygen transport and transfer.

6.1 Transport of O2   - Reading: Bioinorganic Chemistry: Dr. Geoffrey B. Jameson and Dr. James A. Ibers’s “Chapter 4: Biological and Synthetic Dioxygen Carriers” Link: Bioinorganic Chemistry: Dr. Geoffrey B. Jameson and Dr. James A. Ibers’s “Chapter 4: Biological and Synthetic Dioxygen Carriers” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Please click on the link above to access the online textbook.  Then, scroll down the webpage and click on the link for chapter 4 to open a PDF version of the chapter, which you should read in its entirety.  You may also choose to download the PDF for the entire book and then navigate to chapter 4, which begins on page 167.
 
This reading discusses the three main classes of compounds for biological oxygen transport, both in oxygenated and deoxygenated forms.  Hemoglobin is iron-based; hemocyanin is di-copper based; and hemoerythrin is di-iron based.  As you read, pay particular attention to the properties of copper and iron that make them useful for oxygen transport.
 
Please note that this reading also covers the material you will need to know for subunits 6.2-6.4, found below.  When you reach those subunits, you may find it helpful to refer back to this reading to review specific topics.
 
This reading, including note-taking, should take you approximately 8 hours to complete.
 
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6.2 The Hemoglobin Family   Note: The material you need to know for this subunit is covered in the reading assigned beneath subunit 6.1, found above.  Specific information on the hemoglobin family can be found in section I.B.1, on pages 184-185 of the textbook.  In addition, information about oxyhemoglobin can be found in section II.F.2 of the textbook, on page 213.  Spend approximately 30 minutes reviewing this material before moving on to the next subunit of this course.

6.3 The Hemocyanin Family   Note: The material you need to know for this subunit is covered in the reading assigned beneath subunit 6.1, found above.  Specific information on the hemocyanin family can be found in section I.B.2, on pages 185-188 of the textbook.  In addition, information about oxyhemocyanin can be found in section II.F.1, on pages 210-212 of the textbook.  Spend approximately 30 minutes reviewing this material before moving on to the next subunit of this course.

6.4 The Hemerythrin Family   Note: The material you need to know for this subunit is covered in the reading assigned beneath subunit 6.1, found above.  Specific information on the hemerythrin family can be found in section I.B.3, on pages 188-190 of the textbook.  In addition, information about oxyhemerythrin can be found in section II.F.1, on pages 210-212 of the textbook.  Spend approximately 30 minutes reviewing this material before moving on to the next unit of this course.