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CHEM203: Bioinorganic Chemistry

Unit 1: An Introduction To Bioinorganic Chemistry   This introductory unit will provide you with the foundational tools that you will need to understand new concepts developed later in this course, regardless of your background in the field.  You will review important ideas from inorganic chemistry and take a closer look at the basic properties of enzymes, proteins, and peptides that you may have learned about in other courses on biochemistry and molecular biology.  As you progress through this unit, you will discover that many biological molecules, from oxygen-transport proteins to enzymes, require metal ions in order to function.  

Unit 1 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 9.5 hours to complete.
 
☐    Subunit 1.1: 0.5 hour 

☐    Subunit 1.2: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.3: 0.5 hour

☐    Subunit 1.4: 6 hours

☐    Subunit 1.5: 1 hour

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student should be able to:
- Summarize the role of transition-metal complexes in chemical bonding using the terms of hard-versus-soft acid-base interactions and high-versus-low-spin metal complexes. - Identify key structural motifs for metal bonding in biological molecules. - Describe how proteins, including RNA and DNA, act as ligands. - Explain kinetic effects and catalysis as they relate to molecular interactions.

1.1 A Review of Basic Principles in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology   - Reading: Wells College: Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: Bioinorganic Chemistry: Dr. Christopher T. Bailey’s “Principles in Bioinorganic Chemistry” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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1.2 Macromolecules in Biology   - Reading: The University of New Mexico: Cara Lea Council-Garcia’s “Biological Macromolecules” Link: The University of New Mexico: Cara Lea Council-Garcia’s “Biological Macromolecules” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please click on the link above to access and read
through the entire webpage for a review of macromolecules that have
chemical and biological importance, including carbohydrates, lipids,
proteins, and nucleic acids.  As needed, you also can explore the
additional resource links provided throughout the text for more
detailed information on each class of compounds.  Although they do
not have an answer key, the review questions at the bottom of
the webpage may also assist you in mastering this material.  

 This reading should take you approximately 1 hour and 30 minutes to
complete.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.  

1.3 Peptides and Proteins   - Reading: Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative: Biochemistry: “Amino Acids”, “Primary Structure”, “Secondary Structure”, and “Tertiary Structure and Protein Stability” Link: Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative: Biochemistry: “Amino Acids”, “Primary Structure”, “Secondary Structure”, and “Tertiary Structure and Protein Stability” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read these articles, which review fundamental principles related to amino acids and proteins. These concepts will be necessary for you to understand as you approach the remainder of this course. On each page, you can click “Enter Course” to access the material without logging in.
 
Reading these articles should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Terms of Use: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. It is attributed to Carnegie Mellon Open Learning Initiative.

1.4 A Review of Chemical Bonding in Transition-Metal Coordination Compounds   - Reading: Wells College: Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: Bioinorganic Chemistry: Dr. Christopher T. Bailey’s “Transition Metal Chemistry” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)
  • Reading: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay: Inorganic Chemistry: Dr. R. Murugavel’s “Lecture 3 – Transition Metal Complexes” Link: Indian Institute of Technology Bombay: Inorganic Chemistry: Dr. R. Murugavel’s “Lecture 3 – Transition Metal Complexes” (PDF)
      
    Instructions: Please click on the link above and scroll down the webpage to find the link for Dr. Murugavel’s “Lecture 3 – Transition Metal Complexes.”  Click on this link to access an online PDF version of Dr. Murugavel’s PowerPoint presentation on transition-metal complexes.  Please read the entire presentation. 
     
    Note that material in this reading includes a review of some of the concepts introduced in Saylor’s CHEM107 and covered more extensively in Saylor’s CHEM202.  For this reading, focus on how and why the orbitals split as well as the properties – such as magnetism and bonding – that differ between high-spin and low-spin systems. 
     
    Please note that the topics covered in this presentation also encompass some of the material you need to know for sub-subunits 1.4.1-1.4.5, found below.  When you reach those sub-subunits, you may find it helpful to return to this reading in order to review specific concepts.
      
    This reading should take you approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.4.1 Principles of Coordination Chemistry   Note: Some of the material you need to know for this sub-subunit is covered in the two readings assigned beneath subunit 1.4, found above.  You may find it helpful to refer back to those materials as you complete the reading assignment below.

  • Reading: The University of California at Davis: ChemWiki’s “Introduction to Coordination Chemistry” Link: The University of California at Davis: ChemWiki’s “Introduction to Coordination Chemistry” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please click on the link above to access and read the entire webpage.  Note that this material comprises a review of some of the concepts that are covered in Saylor’s CHEM107.  For this reading, focus in particular on understanding how a metal binds its ligands, as this is a process that it is imperative for you to know in order to understand biomolecular interactions with metal centers, a topic developed in detail later in this course.
     
    This reading should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

1.4.2 Closed- and Open-Shell Coordination Compounds   Note: The material you need to know for this sub-subunit is covered in the two readings assigned beneath subunit 1.4, found above.  At this time, please return to those readings to review the concept of closed- and open-shell coordination compounds.  Your review of this material should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

1.4.3 High-Spin Complexes, Low-Spin Complexes, and Magnetism   Note: The material you need to know for this sub-subunit is covered in the two readings assigned beneath subunit 1.4, found above.  At this time, please return to those readings to review the concepts of high-spin complexes, low-spin complexes, and magnetism.  Your review of this material should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

1.4.4 Hard and Soft Acids and Bases   Note: The material you need to know for this sub-subunit is covered in the two readings assigned beneath subunit 1.4, found above.  At this time, please return to those readings to review the concept of hard and soft acids and bases.  Your review of this material should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

1.4.5 Crystal Field Theory, Ligand Field Theory, and Spectrochemical Series   Note: The material you need to know for this sub-subunit is covered in the two readings assigned beneath subunit 1.4, found above.  At this time, please return to those readings to review the topics of crystal field theory, ligand field theory, and spectrochemical series.  Your review of this material should take you approximately 30 minutes to complete.

1.5 Metal Ions and Metal Clusters in Biological Systems   - Reading: The Indian Institute of Technology Bombay: Inorganic Chemistry: Dr. R. Murugavel’s “Lecture 5 – Bioinorganic Chemistry” Link: The Indian Institute of Technology Bombay: Inorganic Chemistry: Dr. R. Murugavel’s “Lecture 5 – Bioinorganic Chemistry” (PDF)
  
Instructions: Please click on the link above and scroll down the webpage to find the link for Dr. Murugavel’s “Lecture 5 – Bioinorganic Chemistry.”  Click on this link to access an online PDF version of Dr. Murugavel’s PowerPoint presentation on bioinorganic chemistry. 
 
This reading introduces you to some important foundational topics, including enzyme activation sites, enzyme activity, and enzyme specificity, in addition to enzyme-substrate formation and cooperativity.  Keep these general concepts in mind as you learn about specific enzymes in more detail throughout this course.
 
This reading should take you approximately 1 hour to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.