Loading...

CHEM202: Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

Unit 5: Spectroscopy of Transition Metal Complexes   Spectroscopic techniques are usually associated with organic molecules and analytical methods.  However, inorganic chemists also use these physical methods to identify compounds and explore their practical applications.  The interaction of radiation in infrared (IR) spectroscopy, or magnetic fields in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, with metal complexes, allows examination of their physical properties.  This unit discusses how these spectra are produced as well as what information can be obtained from the spectra.  In particular, EPR of these complexes has proven useful in the fields of semiconductors and biochemistry for predicting chemical properties.      

Unit 5 Time Advisory
This unit should take you approximately 6 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 5.1: 2.0 hours

☐    Subunit 5.2: 2.0 hours

☐    Subunit 5.3: 2.0 hours

Unit5 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
- Discuss the interaction of infrared radiation and magnetic fields with inorganic complexes. - Define spectroscopically dynamic processes (fluxionality) and propose how the spectra can be resolved. - Describe the spectroscopic techniques contained in this unit.

5.1 Infrared Spectroscopy   - Reading: University of Alberta’s Inorganic Chemistry Spectroscopy Tutorial: “Infrared Spectroscopy” Link: University of Alberta’s Inorganic Chemistry Spectroscopy Tutorial “Infrared Spectroscopy” (HTML and Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Please navigate the pages of the tutorial on IR spectroscopy.  Be sure to click on the links within the presentation for answers to questions and supplemental information.  This material explains how IR radiation interacts with inorganic complexes to produce IR spectra.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.2 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy   - Reading: University of Alberta's Inorganic Chemistry Spectroscopy Tutorial “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy” Link: University of Alberta's Inorganic Chemistry Spectroscopy Tutorial “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy” (HTML and Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Please navigate the pages of the tutorial on NMR spectroscopy.  Be sure to click on the links within the presentation for answers to questions and supplemental information.  This material explains how the magnetic field interacts with inorganic complexes to produce NMR spectra.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Rob Toreki’s Organometallic HyperTextBook: “Fluxionality” Link: Rob Toreki’s Organometallic HyperTextBook: “Fluxionality” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please read the entire webpage.  Also work the three self-test problems at the bottom of the page.  This material discusses dynamic NMR and how to resolve and interpret spectra of fluxional molecules.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

5.3 Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy   - Reading: UC Davis: ChemWiki’s “EPR: Theory” Link: UC Davis: ChemWiki’s “EPR: Theory” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read the entire webpage.  The material introduces the theory of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), which is similar to NMR spectroscopy.  Because it gives information about its surroundings, EPR is often utilized for biochemical and semiconductor applications.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use displayed on the webpage above.