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CHEM106: Physical Chemistry II

Unit 9: Spectroscopy III: Magnetic Resonance   In this unit, you will learn about the interaction of matter with certain radio frequencies in the presence of a magnetic field.  These frequencies can be absorbed and re-emitted by the nuclei or electrons, resulting in unique spectra that correlate with the structure of interacting molecules.

Unit 9 Time Advisory
This unit will take you 16 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 9.1: 6 hours

☐    Subunit 9.2: 5 hours

☐    Subunit 9.3: 5 hours

Unit9 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to: - Describe the scientific principle at the base of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. - Explain how spectra of nuclear magnetic resonance originate and list their applications. - Explain how spectra of electron spin resonance originate and list their applications.

9.1 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy   - Reading: MIT – Advanced Chemical Experimentation and Instrumentation Laboratory: “Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy” Link: MIT – Advanced Chemical Experimentation and Instrumentation Laboratory: “Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy” (HTML)
 
Instructions: On the left vertical menu, please select “Lecture Handouts.”  Open the “Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy” link and read the document.  Studying this resource should take approximately 6 hours to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

9.2 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance   - Reading: Sheffield Hallam University: On-Line Learning: “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy” Link: Sheffield Hallam University: On-Line Learning: “Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy” (HTML)
 
Instructions: The webpage from Sheffield Hallam University gives you a glance at the theoretical principles of NMR.  Studying this resource should take approximately 5 hours to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

9.3 Electron Spin Resonance   - Reading: University of South Carolina: H. A. Farach and C. P. Poole’s “Overview of Electron Spin Resonance and Its Applications” Link: University of South Carolina: H. A. Farach and C. P. Poole’s “Overview of Electron Spin Resonance and Its Applications” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read this webpage from the University of South Carolina for a detailed overview of ESR and its applications.  Studying this resource should take approximately 5 hours to complete.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Assessment 13” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “Assessment 13” (DOC)
     
    Instructions: Complete the attached assessment questions to check your understanding of the material covered thus far. Once you have completed the assessment, you may check your answers against the “Answer Key” (DOC).
     
    Completing this assessment should take approximately 1 hour.

Final Exam   - Final Exam: The Saylor Foundation’s “CHEM106 Final Exam” Link: The Saylor Foundation’s “CHEM106 Final Exam”

 Instructions: You must be logged into your Saylor Foundation School
account in order to access this exam.  If you do not yet have an
account, you will be able to create one, free of charge, after
clicking the link.