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BIO406: Microscopic Anatomy

Unit 3: Tissue

In this unit, we will examine the four types of tissue that make up all of the organs and organ systems of the body. These include epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous tissue. We will discuss how these tissues are similar and different. As you work through this unit, think about where in the body these tissues are located and how they might work together to carry out a common function.  

Unit 3 Time Advisory

This unit will take approximately 18 hours to complete.

  • Subunit 3.1: 4 hours
  • Subunit 3.2: 4 hours
  • Subunit 3.3: 4 hours
  • Subunit 3.4: 4 hours
  • Subunit 3.5: 2 hours

Unit3 Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to: * outline what makes each epithelial, connective, nervous, and muscle tissue unique; and * identify where epithelial, connective, nervous, and muscle tissues are found within the body and how each interacts with other tissue types.

3.1 Epithelial Tissue

NOTE: Epithelial tissue is named based on shape: squamous (flat), cuboidal (cube shaped), or columnar (column shaped) and the number of layers: simple (one layer), stratified (layered), or pseudostratified (one layer that looks like several layers).

3.1.1 Features of Epithelial Tissue

Reading: University of Winnipeg: Dr. Kent Simmons’ “Epithelial Tissue”

Link: University of Winnipeg: Dr. Kent Simmons’ “Epithelial Tissue (HTML)  
Instructions: Read through the entire webpage linked above.
 
Note on the Text: This reading introduces you to epithelial tissue and includes nice microscopic images. These online lab materials are from Dr. Simmons’ course titled Cells and Cellular Processes taught at the University of Winnipeg.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Lecture: YouTube: University of Michigan School of Dentistry: Dr. Donald S. Strachan’s “Survey of Microscopic Anatomy—Epithelium”

Link: YouTube: University of Michigan School of Dentistry: Dr. Donald S. Strachan’s “Survey of Microscopic Anatomy—Epithelium (YouTube)
 
Also available in: iTunes U
 
Instructions: Watch the entire lecture. You may also want to take notes as you view this video lecture. 

Watching this lecture should take approximately 1 hour.
 
Note on the Lecture: Dr. Strachan’s lecture thoroughly covers epithelial tissue. This material provides the basis for understanding the microscopic anatomy of organs and organ systems.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.1.2 Slides of Epithelial Tissue

Reading: The Ohio State University at Lima’s “Epithelial Tissue”

Link: The Ohio State University at Lima’s “Epithelial Tissue” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on each hyperlink of the different types of epithelial tissue to view a slide examining and labeling the parts of each type.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.2 Connective Tissue

3.2.1 Features of Connective Tissue

Reading: Southern Illinois University School of Medicine: Dr. David King’s “Connective Tissue Study Guide”

Link: Southern Illinois University School of Medicine: Dr. David King’s “Connective Tissue Study Guide (HTML)
 
Instructions: Work your way through the page, clicking on the hyperlinks as you read. Stop when you get to Functions of Connective Tissue. Function falls under physiology and is outside the scope of this class. 
 
Note on the text: This study guide gives you a very thorough overview of connective tissue, including its cells and fibers, where it is found, and the various types. It seems like a lot of material, but learning all of this now will better prepare you when you encounter connective tissue making up organs and organ systems. Note that Dr. King is an Associate Professor in the Department of Zoology and the Department of Anatomy at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Reading: University of Winnipeg: Dr. Kent Simmons’ “Connective Tissue”

Link: University of Winnipeg: Dr. Kent Simmons’ “Connective Tissue (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through the entire webpage linked above.
 
Note on the Text: This reading introduces you to connective tissue and includes nice microscopic images of these tissues. These online lab materials are from Dr. Simmons’ course titled Cells and Cellular Processes taught at the University of Winnipeg.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.2.2 Slides of Connective Tissue

Web Media: The Ohio State University at Lima’s “Connective Tissue”

Link: The Ohio State University at Lima’s “Connective Tissue” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on each hyperlink to view some of the connective tissue types found in the body. 
 
Note on the Media: Connective tissue available to view include adipose (fat), areolar (the most widely distributed type of connective tissue), dense regular (found connecting bones to bone and muscle to bone), and blood. 
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.3 Muscle Tissue

3.3.1 Features of Muscle Tissue

Reading: University of Winnipeg: Dr. Kent Simmons’ “Muscle Tissue”

Link: University of Winnipeg: Dr. Kent Simmons’ “Muscle Tissue (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through the entire webpage linked above.
 
Note on the Text: This reading introduces you to the three types of muscle tissue and includes nice microscopic images of these tissues. These online lab materials are from Dr. Simmons’ course titled Cells and Cellular Processes taught at the University of Winnipeg.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

Web Media: YouTube: Khan Academy’s “Anatomy of a Muscle Cell”

Link: YouTube: Khan Academy’s “Anatomy of a Muscle Cell” (YouTube)
 
Instructions: Watch this video, in which the presenter draws the anatomical structures of muscle cells while discussing their structure and function.
 
Watching this video and taking notes should take approximately 45 minutes.
 
Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License. It is attributed to Khan Academy and the original version can be found here.

3.3.2 Slides of Muscle Tissue

Lecture: Wisc-Online: Barbara Liang’s “Muscle and Connective Tissue”

Link: Wisc-Online: Barbara Liang’s “Muscle and Connective Tissue (Adobe Flash)
 
Instructions: Read each slide in this presentation and view the photos carefully. You may use the “back” and “next” buttons to move from one slide to the next. Also, at the end you can test your knowledge of muscle and connective tissue using the interactive quiz. 
 
Note on the Text: This presentation discusses the different muscle types as well as connective tissue types. Thus, this media also covers section 2.2 of this course. The material housed on this online library is created by faculty from the Wisconsin Technical College System.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.4 Nervous Tissue

NOTE: The neuron is the nervous system cell responsible for signaling. The cell body, where the nucleus is found in the neuron, is known as the soma. Short projections, known as dendrites, bring the signal into the cell and a longer projection, known as the axon, carries the signal away from the cell body.  

3.4.1 Features of Nervous Tissue

Lecture: Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine: Dr. Thomas Caceci’s “Nervous Tissue”

Link: Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine: Dr. Thomas Caceci’s “Nervous Tissue (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read through the entire lecture linked above.
 
Note on the Lecture: Dr. Caceci’s nervous tissue laboratory exercise not only does an excellent job of explaining the structural anatomy of nervous tissue, but it also discusses the stains necessary to visualize nervous tissue microscopically. Although slides of the brain and spinal cord are included in this exercise, you can stop when you get to Nervous System Organs.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.4.2 Slides of Nervous Tissue

Web Media: The Ohio State University at Lima’s “Nervous Tissue” Link: The Ohio State University at Lima’s “Nervous Tissue” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Click on each hyperlink to view the neuron.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

3.5 Review of Tissues

Assessment: McGraw-Hill Higher Education: David Shier’s, Jackie L. Butler’s, and Ricki Lewis’s Hole’s Human Anatomy & Physiology: “Multiple Choice Quiz”

Link: McGraw-Hill Higher Education: David Shier’s, Jackie L. Butler’s, and Ricki Lewis’s Hole’s Human Anatomy & Physiology: “Multiple Choice Quiz (HTML)
 
Instructions: Use this quiz to evaluate how much you learned from modules 2.1-2.4. You may click on “submit answers” at the end of the quiz to see your results. Note this is for your own information; please do NOT attempt to e-mail your quiz grade to an instructor or facilitator as indicated on the results webpage.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.