Loading...

BIO402: Pathobiology

Unit 2: The Inflammatory Reaction and the Immune Response   This unit will introduce you to the ways in which the body protects itself from microorganisms and other causes of disease (including its own cells!).  We will start with the body’s first line of defense, which includes the skin, mucous membranes, and the body’s own antimicrobial secretions.  Next, you will see what happens when this barrier is penetrated.  Finally, you will see how the body prepares itself for future attacks. 
           
Note that the immune system is comprised of two divisions: the innate or non-specific division and the adaptive or specific division.  The innate division is further broken down into the cell mediated and humoral divisions.

Unit 2 Time Advisory
This unit will take approximately 9 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 2.1: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 2.2: 3 hours

☐    Subunit 2.3: 3 hours

Unit2 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

  • Describe the role of inflammation and the inflammatory response.
  • Identify the major factors involved in the innate (non-specific) immune response.
  • Compare and contrast the cells involved in the innate and adaptive (specific) immune response.

2.1 Inflammatory Response   - Web Media: You Tube: “The Inflammatory Response” Link: “The Inflammatory Response” (YouTube)
           
Instructions:  Watch this short video (4:06 minutes) about the inflammatory response.  Notice how the body responds in a non-discriminatory manner with this type of response. 
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: Queen’s University of Belfast: Staff Workstation Initiative 3’s “Inflammation” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

2.1.1 Innate Immune Response   - Web Media: Khan Academy’s “Role of Phagocytosis in Innate or Nonspecific Immunity” Link: Khan Academy’s “Role of Phagocytosis in Innate or Nonspecific Immunity” (Adobe Flash)
 
Also available in:
iTunes U

[YouTube](http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1N2rENXq_Y&feature=player_embedded)  
    
 Instructions:  View this video (16:20 minutes), which introduces
the first and second lines of defense and then discusses
phagocytosis.  The term phagocytosis means refers to the process by
which phagocytic cells engulf microorganisms, dead cells, and other
debris.  
    
 Terms of Use: This video is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerives United States License 3.0]().
 It is attributed to the Khan Academy. 
  • Reading: University of South Carolina School of Medicine’s Microbiology and Immunology On-line: Dr. Gene Mayer’s Immunology, “Innate (Non-Specific) Immunity” Link:  University of South Carolina School of Medicine’s Microbiology and Immunology On-line: Dr. Gene Mayer’s Immunology, “Innate (Non-Specific) Immunity” (HTML)
     
    Instructions:  Read the following five sections: “Overview of the Immune System,” “Innate (Non-Specific) Immunity,” “Phagocytosis and Intracellular Killing,” “Nitric Oxide-Dependent Killing,” and “Non-Specific Killer Cells.”  These readings will help you understand how the body prevents microorganisms from penetrating into its interior and the non-specific mechanisms that respond when such an invasion takes place.
     
    Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

2.1.2 The Effectiveness of Innate Immunity   - Interactive Lab: American Museum of Natural History’s “Infection Detection Protection”

Link: American Museum of Natural History’s “[Infection Detection
Protection](http://www.amnh.org/nationalcenter/infection/03_inf/03_inf.html)”
(Adobe Shockwave)  
              
 Instructions:  This website is provided by the American Museum of
Natural History.  As you have already learned, there are a number of
mechanisms in place that prevent microorganisms from penetrating the
body’s exterior and causing infection and disease.  For this
exercise, play the game “Infection.”  Although this is a simple
game, it provides a very realistic view of the complexity of the
body’s own defenses.    
    
 Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

2.2 Immune Response   - Web Media: Garland Science’s: “The Immune Response” Link: Garland Science’s: “The Immune Response” (YouTube)
 
Instructions:  View this short video (1:43 minutes), which introduces the immune response.
 
Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.
 

  • Reading: University of South Carolina School of Medicine’s Microbiology and Immunology On-line: Dr. Gene Mayer and Dr. Jennifer Nyland’s Immunology, “Cells Involved in Immune Responses and Antigen Recognition” Link: University of South Carolina School of Medicine’s Microbiology and Immunology On-line: Dr. Gene Mayer and Dr. Jennifer Nyland’s Immunology,Cells Involved in Immune Responses and Antigen Recognition” (HTML)
     
    Instructions:  This reading covers the main cells that mediate the immune response.  At the end of this reading, there is a comparison between the non-specific and specific immune response.
     
    Terms of Use:  Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation’s “Inflammation and the Immune Response” Link:  The Saylor Foundation’s “Inflammation and the Immune Response” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Complete this multiple choice assessment. 

    Completing this assessment should take approximately 30 minutes.