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ARTH406: Buddhist Art

Unit 4: Buddhist Art and Architecture in China, Korea, and Japan   This unit examines the development of Mahayana Buddhist art and architecture in China, Korea, and Japan, following its transmission to East Asia via the Silk Roads.  We will first focus on Chinese Buddhist art and architecture from the fourth through the ninth centuries CE and then examine Buddhist art in Korea until the founding of the Chos?n dynasty in 1392.  Finally, we will survey the development of Buddhist art and architecture in Japan from roughly the sixth through the sixteenth centuries.  After completing this unit, you will be able to identify major Chinese, Korean, and Japanese Buddhist monuments, the types of Buddhist paintings, sculpture, and ritual objects made and used by East Asian Buddhist practitioners, and the relationship between Buddhist art and architecture from these three countries.

Unit 4 Time Advisory
This unit will take you approximately 35 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 4.1: 15 hours

☐    Subunit 4.2: 7 hours

☐    Subunit 4.3: 13 hours

Unit4 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  • Identify major Chinese, Korean, and Japanese Buddhist works of art and monuments.
  • Compare and contrast major Chinese, Korean, and Japanese Buddhist works of art and monuments.
  • Explain the major developments in Buddhist art and architecture as the religion spread from China to Korea to Japan.
  • Compare and contrast the patronage of Buddhism by different rulers in China, Korea, and Japan.

4.1 Buddhist Art and Architecture in China   4.1.1 Buddhism in China: Overview   - Lecture: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Michael Knight’s “Buddhist Arts of the Three Kingdoms and Six Dynasties” Parts I and II Link: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Michael Knight’s “Buddhist Arts of the Three Kingdoms and Six Dynasties” Parts I and II (iTunes U)
 
Instructions: Please note that these lectures cover materials for subunits 4.1.1-4.1.3.  Click on the hyperlink titled “View in iTunes” for lectures 15 and 16, listed on the webpage.  Please view the entirety of both lectures.

 Note on the Link: These lectures by Michael Knight are part of the
Asian Art Museum of San Francisco's “Arts of China” lecture
series.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation's "Buddhism in China: A Historical Overview" The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

4.1.2 Early Buddhist Art and Architecture (4th-6th Centuries)   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Northern and Southern Dynasties,” “Buddha Maitreya (Mile),” “Altarpiece Dedicated to Buddha Maitreya (Mile),” and “Bodhisattva, probably Avalokiteshvara (Guanyin)” Links: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Northern and Southern Dynasties” (HTML), “Buddha Maitreya (Mile)”(HTML), “Altarpiece Dedicated to Buddha Maitreya (Mile)”(HTML), and “Bodhisattva, probably Avalokiteshvara (Guanyin) (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read these webpages about the Northern and
Southern Dynasties and Northern Wei (386-584) and Northern Qi
(550-577) Buddhist Art.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.3 Northern Wei Cave Temples   - Web Media: You Tube: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco’s “Chinese Buddhist Cave Shrines” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

[Submit Materials](/contribute/)
  • Lecture: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Patricia Berger’s “Exemplary Lives in the Buddhist caves of Northern China” Part I and II Link: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Patricia Berger’s “Exemplary Lives in the Buddhist Caves of Northern China” Parts I and II (iTunes U)

    Instructions: This lecture covers material from subunits 4.1.3 and 4.1.4.  Click on “View in iTunes” for lectures 5 and 6 listed on this webpage.  Please view the entirety of both lectures.

    Note on the Link: These lectures by Patricia Berger are part of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco's “Passport to Asia” lecture series.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.3.1 Yungang   - Reading: University of Washington: Patricia Buckley Ebrey’s A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization: “Buddhist Cave Temples” Link: University of Washington: Patricia Buckley Ebrey’s A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization:Buddhist Cave Temples” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the introductory paragraph and the text
in the middle section under “Yungang.”  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Yungang Grottos,” “Cave 20,” “Cave 19, West Side,” “Cave 18,” and “Cave 18” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Yungang Grottos” (HTML), “Cave 20” (HTML), “Cave 19, West Side” (HTML), “Cave 18” (HTML), and “Cave 18” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read the text and look at the images on each of these webpages.  Please note that the webpages for “Cave 18” contain two separate images; make sure to view each “Cave 18” webpage linked above.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Web Media: WHTour.org’s and Tito Dupret’s “Yungang Grottoes” Interactive Map The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

4.1.3.2 Binyang Caves   - Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Buddhist Pentad,” “Buddhist Assembly,” “Northern Wei Style of Buddhist Sculpture,” “Amida Pentad,” and “Amida Pentad” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Buddhist Pentad,” “Buddhist  Assembly ,” “Northern Wei Style of Buddhist Sculpture,” “Amida Pentad,” and “Amida Pentad

 Note: All webpages are in HTML format.  

 Instructions: Please read these webpages about the Binyang Caves
that were constructed by the Northern Wei rulers after they moved
their capital to Luoyang.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.
  • Reading: Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s “Offering Procession of the Empress as Donor with Her Court, ca. 522 C.E.” Link: Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s “Offering Procession of the Empress as Donor with Her Court, ca. 522 C.E.” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read this text about one of the reliefs from the Binyang Caves that depicts a Northern Wei empress and her attendants.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.3.3 Dunhuang: Pre-Tang Dynasty Caves   - Reading: University of Washington: Patricia Buckley Ebrey’s A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization: “Buddhist Cave Temples” Link: University of Washington: Patricia Buckley Ebrey’s A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization: “Buddhist Cave Temples”(HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the text under “Dunhuang.”  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Facade,” “Maitreya,” “Meditating Buddha,” “Hunting Scene,” “The 500 Bandits,” and “Thunder God” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Facade” (HTML), “Maitreya” (HTML), “Meditating Buddha” (HTML), “Hunting Scene” (HTML), “The 500 Bandits” (HTML), and  “Thunder God” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please read these webpages about pre-Tang Buddhist Art at Dunhuang in their entirety.  Please pay particular attention to the details of each image.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

4.1.4 Tang Dynasty Buddhist Art and Architecture (618-906)   4.1.4.1 Tang Dynasty Buddhist Sculpture   - Reading: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Internationalism in the Tang Dynasty (618-906),” “Buddha Vairocana,” “Buddhist stele,” and “Buddha, Probably Amitabha (Amituo)” Link: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Internationalism in the Tang Dynasty” (HTML), “Buddha Vairocana (Dari)”(HTML), “Buddhist stele” (HTML), and “Buddha,  Probably  Amitabha (Amituo)” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Read these webpages as an introduction to Tang Dynasty Buddhist sculpture.

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpages above.

4.1.4.2 Tang Dynasty Cave Temples   4.1.4.2.1 Longmen   - Reading: University of Washington: Patricia Buckley Ebrey’s A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization: “Buddhist Cave Temples” Link: University of Washington: Patricia Buckley Ebrey’s A Visual Sourcebook of Chinese Civilization: “Buddhist Cave Temples” (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read the text under “Longmen.”  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Fengxian Si,” “Vajrapani,” “Vaisravana,” “Bodhisattva,” “Vairocana,” “Bodhisattva and Ananda,” “Kanjing Si,” “Shakyamuni Teaching,” and “Arhats” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Fengxian Si,” “Vajrapani,” “Vaisravana,” “Bodhisattva,” “Vairocana,” “Bodhisattva and Ananda,”  “Kanjing Si,” “Shakyamuni Teaching,” and “Arhats
     
    Note: All websites are in HTML format.
     
    Instructions: Please read these webpages about Tang Dynasty Caves at Longmen in their entirety.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

4.1.4.2.2 Tang Dynasty Caves at Dunhuang   - Reading: Old Stones: Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Guanyin,” “Vimalakirti,” “Bodhisattva with Ananda and Lokapala,” and “Dancer Holding a Pipa Behind Her Back” Links: Old Stones: Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Guanyin,” “Vimalakirti,” “Bodhisattva with Ananda and Lokapala,” and “Dancer Holding a Pipa Behind Her Back
 
Note: All websites are in HTML format.
 
Instructions: Please read these webpages about Tang Dynasty Buddhist Caves at Dunhuang in their entirety.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • Reading: Dunhuang Academy’s “Mogao Cave 96 (Early Tang 618-705AD)” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

4.1.4.3 Great Goose Pagoda   - Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Great Goose Pagoda (Dayan Ta)” and “Great Goose Pagoda (Dayan Ta)” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Great Goose Pagoda (Dayan Ta)” (HTML) and “Great Goose Pagoda (Dayan Ta)” (HTML)
 
Instructions: Please read these webpages about the Great Goose Pagoda in Xi’an.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

4.1.4.4 Foguang Temple   - Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “East Hall,” “East Hall,” “East Hall,” “Altar Sculptures,” “Altar Sculptures,” “Arhats,” “Vaisravana,” “Zushi Ta,” “Manjusri Hall,” “Manjusri Hall,” and “Bodhisattva Manjusri” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “East Hall,” “East Hall,” “East Hall,” “Altar Sculptures,” “Altar Sculptures,” “Arhats,” “Vaisravana,” “Zushi Ta,” “Manjusri Hall,” “Manjusri Hall,” “Bodhisattva Manjusri,” and “Wooden Pagoda
 
Note: All websites are in HTML format.
 
Instructions: Please read these webpages about the Foguang Temple.  Please note there are three webpages with images and information for “East Hall.” 
 
Note on the Text: The Arhats, Manjusri Hall and the Wooden Pagoda at Foguang Temple do not date to the Tang Dynasty.   The Arhats were made during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), the Manjusri Hall was constructed during the Jin Dynasty (1115-1234) and the Wooden Pagoda was built during the Liao Dynasty (907-1125).
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

4.1.4.5 Famen Temple   - Reading: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Famen Si,” “Kasyapa,” “Carved Wooden Doors with Guardians,” “Gold Monk’s Staff,” “Bodhisattva Presenting a Prayer Tablet,” “Reliquary Casket,” “Nested Reliquary Casket,” “Reliquary in the Form of a Model Pagoda,” “Censers,” and “Openwork Basket” Links: Old Stones: The Monuments of Art History: Michael D. Gunther’s “Famen Si” “Kasyapa,” “Carved Wooden Doors with Guardians,” “Gold Monk’s Staff,” “Bodhisattva Presenting a Prayer Tablet,” “Reliquary Casket,” “Nested Reliquary Casket,” “Reliquary in the Form of a Model Pagoda” “Censers” and “Openwork Basket
 
Note: all websites are in HTML format.
 
Instructions: Please read these webpages about Famen Si and the Tang Dynasty Art recovered from its crypt in their entirety.
 
Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.1.5 Buddhist Art after the Tang Dynasty   - Lecture: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Patricia Berger’s “Later Buddhist Arts” Parts I and II Link: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Patricia Berger’s “Later Buddhist Arts” Parts I and II (iTunes U)
 
Instructions: Click on the “View in iTunes” hyperlink for lectures 35 and 36.   Please view the entirety of both lecture.

 Note on the Link: These lectures by Patricia Berger are part of the
Asian Art Museum of San Francisco's “Arts of China” lecture
series.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.2 Buddhist Art and Architecture in Korea   4.2.1 Buddhism in Korea: Overview   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s "The Arts of Korea: A Guide for Educators" Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “The Arts of Korea: A Guide for Educators" (PDF)

 Instructions: Please download this resource by clicking on the link
at the bottom of the page labeled, “Download the Resource (PDF).”
Then, read “Buddhism” and “Buddhist Art” on pages 37-44 of the PDF
file as an introduction to Buddhism in Korea and Korean Buddhist
Art.  You will be referring to this resource in other subunits, so
you may consider saving the PDF file.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.

4.2.2 Buddhist Art of the Three Kingdoms and Unified Silla (57 BCE-935 CE)   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s "The Arts of Korea: A Guide for Educators" Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “The Arts of Korea: A Guide for Educators" (PDF)

 Instructions: Please download this resource by clicking on the link
at the bottom of the page labeled, “Download the Resource
(PDF).”  Then, read “Overview of Korean History: Three Kingdoms
Period,” “Overview of Korean History: Unified Silla,” “Overview of
Korean Art History: Three Kingdoms Period,” “Overview of Korean Art
History: Unified Silla,” “Image 5,” and “Image 9,” on pages 27-29,
82, and 86 of the PDF file.   
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Pensive Bodhisattva” Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Pensive Bodhisattva” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: Please look closely at and read the text about this Korean Buddhist statue from the Three Kingdoms Period.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.2.3 Buddhist Art and Architecture during the Kory? Dynasty (918-1392)   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s The Arts of Korea: A Guide for Educators Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “The Arts of Korea: A Guide for Educators" (PDF)

 Instructions: Please download this resource by clicking on the link
at the bottom of the page labeled, “Download the Resource (PDF).” 
Then, read “Overview of Korean History: Kory?,” “Overview of Korean
Art History: Kory?,” “Artists and Materials: Buddhist Painting, “and
“Images 15-19” on pages 30-31, 57-59, 72, and 92-99 of the PDF
file.  
    
 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Web Media: Vimeo: Wow! Korea Culture’s “Treasures of Korea” Link: Vimeo: Wow! Korea Culture’s “Treasures of Korea” (HTML)
     
    Instructions: View this short video about the current status of Korea’s effort to preserve their national heritage.
     
    Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license. It is attributed to Wow! Korea Culture and the original version can be found here

  • Lecture: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Lewis Lancaster’s “Beyond Words at the Haein Monastery in Korea: An Event of Art as Writing” Parts I and II Link: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Lewis Lancaster’s“Beyond Words at the Haein Monastery in Korea: An Event of Art as Writing” Parts I and II (iTunes U)
     
    Instructions: Click on the “View in iTunes” hyperlink for lectures 12 and 13.  Please view the entirety of both lectures.

    Note on the Link: These lectures by Lewis Lancaster are part of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco's “Passport to Asia” lecture series.

    Note on the Lectures: These lectures focus on the Haeinsa Temple’s complete collection of the Buddhist scriptures carved onto wooden printing blocks.
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

4.3 Buddhist Art and Architecture of Japan   4.3.1 Buddhism in Japan: Overview   - Reading: Boundless: “Introduction” and “Art of Zen Buddhism” Link: Boundless: “Introduction” (PDF) and “Art of Zen Buddhism” (PDF)

Instructions: Please read these texts in their entirety for an
introduction to the topics of Buddhism in Japan and the art of zen
Buddhism.  Please click on all of the images to enlarge and study
them more closely.

Terms of Use: This resource is licensed under a [Creative Commons
Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported
License](http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/). They are
attributed to Boundless, and the original versions can be found
[here](https://www.boundless.com/art-history/japan-before-1333/buddhist-japan/introduction-8/) and
[here](https://www.boundless.com/art-history/japan-before-1333/kamakura-period/art-zen-buddhism/).

4.3.2 Buddhist Art and Architecture of the Asuka and Nara Periods (538-794)   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Asuka and Nara Periods,” “Segment of a Daihokobutsu Kegongyo (Avatamsaka Sutra),” and “Miniature Pagoda” Links: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Asuka and Nara Periods” (HTML), “Segment of a Daihokobutsu Kegongyo (Avatamsaka Sutra) (HTML), and Miniature Pagoda (HTML)

 Instructions: Please read these webpages as an introduction to
Buddhist art of the Asuka and Nara Periods.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Asian Historical Architecture’s “H?ry?-ji” Link: Asian Historical Architecture’s “H?ry?-ji” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read this overview of the Buddhist temple complex of H?ry?-ji in Nara.  Make sure to look at the images in the photo gallery at the top of the page.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: Asian Historical Architecture’s “T?dai-ji” Link: Asian Historical Architecture’s “T?dai-ji” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read this overview of the Buddhist temple complex of T?dai-ji in Nara.  Make sure to look at the images in the photo gallery at the top of the page.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Web Media: YouTube: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco’s “Ancient Temples of Nara” Link: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco’s “Ancient Temples of Nara” (YouTube)

    Also available in
    iTunes U
     
    Instructions: Please watch this brief video about the Buddhist temples of Nara in its entirety (5:21 minutes).
     
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: A to Z Photo Dictionary: Japanese Buddhist Statuary’s “Asuka Period Photo Tour,” “Japanese Busshi (Sculptors), Asuka Period,” and “Nara Period Photo Tour" Link: A to Z Photo Dictionary: Japanese Buddhist Statuary’s “Asuka Period Photo Tour,” “Japanese Busshi (Sculptors), Asuka Period,” and “Nara Period Photo Tour

    Instructions: Please read the above pages as an introduction to the development of Buddhist sculpture during the Asuka and Nara Periods.
                           
    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “The Tamamushi Shrine” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

4.3.3 Heian and Kamakura Buddhist Art and Architecture (794-1333)   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Heian Period” and “Kamakura and Nanbukucho Periods” Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Heian Period” (HTML) and “Kamakura and Nanbukucho Periods” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read these introductions to the Buddhist art of the
Heian, Kamakura and Nanbukucho Periods.  After you have read the
text, click on “View Slideshow” and view examples  
 Heian, Kamakura, and Nanbukucho Buddhist Art in the Metropolitan
Museum of Art.  Click on each individual image and read the
accompanying text.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Asian Historical Architecture’s “By?d?-in” Link: Asian Historical Architecture’s “By?d?-in” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read this overview of the By?d?-in in Kyoto.  Make sure to look at the images in the photo gallery at the top of the page.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Lecture: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Japanese Mandalas Avatars and Emanations: Bernard Faure’s “Japanese Mandalas—Under the Gaze of the Stars: Astral Mandalas in Medieval Japan” Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Japanese Mandalas Avatars and Emanations: Barnard Faure’s “Japanese Mandalas—Under the Gaze of the Stars: Astral Mandalas in Medieval Japan” (HTML)

    Instructions: First read the text on the right of the page. Then click on the hyperlink labeled, “video” above the left side of the image and watch the video in its entirety (1 hour, 11 minutes) to learn more about Japanese Buddhist mandalas.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “Heian and Kamakura Buddhist Sculpture” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “Heian and Kamakura Buddhist Works on Paper” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials

4.3.4 Zen Buddhism   - Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Zen Buddhism” Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History’s “Zen Buddhism” (HTML)

 Instructions: Read this overview of Zen Buddhism and its role in
the arts of Japan.  After you have read the text, click on “View
Slideshow” and view examples of Zen Art in the Metropolitan Museum
of Art.  Click on each individual image and read the accompanying
text.  

 Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use
displayed on the webpage above.
  • Reading: Asian Historical Architecture’s “Ry?an-ji” Link: Asian Historical Architecture’s “Ry?an-ji” (HTML)

    Instructions: Please read this overview of the Buddhist temple complex of Ry?an-ji.  Make sure to look at the images in the photo gallery at the top of the webpage.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Lecture: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Gregory Levine’s “Where’s the Zen: Art at the Daitokuji Monastery” Parts I and II Link: iTunes U: Asian Art Museum of San Francisco: Lewis Lancaster’s“Where’s the Zen: Art at the Daitokuji Monastery” Parts I and II (iTunes U)
     
    Instructions: Click on the “View in iTunes” hyperlink for lectures 16 and 17 from the list on the webpage.  Please view the entirety of both lectures.

    Note on the Link: These lectures by Gregory Levine are part of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco's “Passport to Asia” lecture series.

    Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “Zen Painting” The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

    Submit Materials