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ARTH208: Modern Art

Unit 1: A New Perspective in Art: Impressionism   In this unit, you will begin by learning about the visual arts that were popular in mid-19th-century France and the role that the Academy of Art played in the eventual emergence of the first modern art movement, Impressionism. Along with Impressionism, you will study the movement that immediately preceded it, Realism, analyze important artworks by key artists in both movements, and learn what was accomplished via new or rediscovered methods and ideas, such as the newfound embrace of plein air painting; the use of quick, gestural brushstrokes; and the abandonment of traditional one-point perspective.

Unit 1 Time Advisory
Time Advisory:  This unit should take you 8.5 hours to complete.

☐    Subunit 1.1: 3.5 hours ☐    Subunit 1.1.1: 0.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.1.2: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.1.3: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2: 4 hours ☐    Subunit 1.2.1: 1 hour

☐    Subunit 1.2.2: 1.5 hours

☐    Subunit 1.2.3: 1.5 hours

☐    Assignment: 1 hour

Unit1 Learning Outcomes
Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:
- Explain the role of the Academy of Art in 19th-century Paris and why many artists rebelled against the Academy. - Describe the key differences between a Realist artwork and an Impressionist artwork, and what was modern about both movements. - Identify the major characteristics of the work of Gustave Courbet, Edgar Degas, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, and explain why their work is important to the development of modern art.

1.1 The French Salon and Its Deterrents   1.1.1 The Academy of Art   - Reading: The Art Story Foundation’s Terms and Concepts: “The Academy of Art” Link: The Art Story Foundation’s Terms and Concepts: “The Academy of Art” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the linked page in full. While reading, you may wish to take notes on the artistic genres and subject matter that were favored by the Academy and its exhibitions. Meanwhile, look for examples of what artists began to rebel against in the 19th century.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of The Art Story Foundation and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

1.1.2 Gustave Courbet and Realism   - Reading: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Gustave Courbet” Link: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Gustave Courbet” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the linked page in full, while paying particularly close attention to each of the Major Works and the accompanying texts. In this reading, you will note that Courbet’s paintings fall into the category of Realism. With this in mind, consider how Courbet’s subject matter differs from that of Renaissance artists like Michelangelo or Titian, how his approach to this subject matter reflected his commitment to left-wing politics, and how his work helped pave the way for Impressionism.
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of The Art Story Foundation and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

1.1.3 Edgar Degas: From Realism to Impressionism   - Reading: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Edgar Degas” Link: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Edgar Degas” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the linked page in full. While reading, consider Degas’s chosen subject matter (people, places, settings) and try to identify visual elements that suggest the artist’s gradual evolution in both subject and style. You may wish to take notes while viewing the artist’s Major Works. What makes Degas both a Realist and Impressionist artist?
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of The Art Story Foundation and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

1.2 French Impressionism   1.2.1 Impressionism   - Reading: The Art Story Foundation’s Movements: “Impressionism” Link: The Art Story Foundation’s Movements: “Impressionism” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the linked page in full. Pay close attention to, and take notes on, the Impressionist artists and the characteristics that defined their art. Additionally, look for references to subsequent modern movements that were influenced by Impressionism.

 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of The Art Story Foundation and can be viewed in its
original form
[here](http://theartstory.org/movement-impressionism.htm)
(HTML).  Please note that this material is under copyright and
cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission
from the copyright holder. 

1.2.2 Édouard Manet: The “First Modern Artist”   - Reading: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Édouard Manet”

Link: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “[Édouard
Manet](https://resources.saylor.org/wwwresources/archived/site/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/the-art-story-foundation-2.pdf)”
(PDF)  
    
 Instructions: Read the linked page in full. Pay close attention to
the repeated use of the word “modern” in this page, and consider
what it is referencing. When you finish reading, consider why art
historians have commonly referred to Manet as the “first modern
artist.”  
    
 Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the
kind permission of The Art Story Foundation and can be viewed in its
original form
[here](http://theartstory.org/artist-manet-edouard.htm)
(HTML).  Please note that this material is under copyright and
cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission
from the copyright holder. 

1.2.3 Claude Monet   - Reading: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Claude Monet” Link: The Art Story Foundation’s Artists: “Claude Monet” (PDF)
 
Instructions: Read the linked page in full. You will note from this reading that Monet was both an accomplished colorist and a master of plein air(open air) painting; he is also considered the preeminent Impressionist artist. However, many critics at the time accused Monet’s work of being “incomplete.” Why would such a claim be made?
 
Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of The Art Story Foundation and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).  Please note that this material is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder. 

  • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation's "Unit 1 Quiz" Link: The Saylor Foundation's “Unit 1 Quiz" (PDF)

    Instructions: Please click on the link above to download this assessment.  Please complete all of the questions for the Unit 1 Quiz, and then check your answers against the Saylor Foundation's "Answer Key to Unit 1 Quiz." (PDF) You should spend approximately 15 minutes completing this quiz.