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ARTH206: The Italian Proto-Renaissance To Mannerism

  • Unit 3: The High and Late Renaissance  

    At the end of the 15th century and the beginning of the 16th century, three Italian artists epitomized the achievements of Renaissance art: Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. In Venice, a distinctive style of painting, recognizable by its emphasis on soft, hazy effects and a strong interest in light and color, developed. Art created later in the century in the style of the Renaissance and High Renaissance is referred to as late Renaissance art. In painting and sculpture, some of its characteristics include harmonious and balanced compositions or structures, a clear sense of space, and an interest in natural settings, the human anatomy, and human psychology. The major characteristics of architecture from this period include: centralized plans, simple geometric shapes, regularity of design, and styles borrowed from Classical Antiquity. 

    Unit 3 Time Advisory

    This unit will take approximately 27 hours to complete.

    ☐ Subunit 3.1: 5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 3.2: 5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 3.3: 3 hours

    ☐ Subunit 3.4: 3 hours

    ☐ Subunit 3.5: 2 hours

    ☐ Subunit 3.6: 5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 3.7: 0.5 hour

    ☐ Subunit 3.8: 3.5 hours

    Unit3 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the expression “High Renaissance.”
    • Identify the modes of expression of the High Renaissance in the art of Italy.
    • Explain how specific historical contexts, events, and figures affected Italian High Renaissance art.
    • Recognize the individual style and interests of important artists of the High Renaissance.
    • Retrace the artistic development of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael.
    • Assess the impact of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael on sixteenth century art in Italy.
    • Recognize important artworks of the Italian High Renaissance and describe them in terms of their form, content, and general history of their creation.
    • Assess the role of art and artists during the High Renaissance in Italy.
    • Discuss specific artistic techniques used during the High Renaissance in Italy.
  • 3.1 The Sixteenth Century in Italy  

  • 3.1.1 Timeline  

    • Reading: Connexions: Jack Maxfield’s “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe: 1501 to 1600”

      Link: Connexions: Jack Maxfield’s “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe: 1501 to 1600” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML and EPUB

      Instructions: Please read this passage in order to get a sense for the historical context surrounding the High and Late Renaissance period of Italian art. While you should focus most on the passage treating Italy, it is recommended that you read the page in its entirety to get a sense for parallel historical developments throughout Europe.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed by Jack Maxfield under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the condition that you correctly attribute it.

  • 3.1.2 The Age of the Reformation  

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s “1500-1600: The End of the Renaissance and the Reformation”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “1500-1600: The End of the Renaissance and the Reformation” (PDF)

      Also Available in: HTML

      Instructions: Please read this article to get a sense for the impact the Reformation and Counter-Reformation had on image production during the sixteenth century as well as to situate Italy’s position in this battle of religions and ensuing battle of artistic practices. 

      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML). It is attributed to Smart History and the original version can be found here (HTML).

  • 3.1.3 An Age of Scientific Inquiry  

    • Reading: Connexions: Albert Van Helden’s “Copernican System”

      Link: Connexions: Albert Van Helden’s “Copernican System” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML and Epub

      Instructions: Please read this article discussing the scientific studies and discoveries of Copernicus and go to any links provided by the author.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed Albert Van Helden under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the condition that you correctly attribute it.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s Professor Joseph Dauben’s “Galileo and the Art of Renaissance Science”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s Professor Joseph Dauben’s “Galileo and the Art of Renaissance Science” (PDF)

      Also Available in: HTML

      Instructions: Please read this article to get a sense for the 16th century as an age of scientific experimentation and a period influenced by Galileo. 

      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License 3.0 (HTML). It is attributed to Smart History and the original version can be found here (HTML). 

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s Professor Joseph Dauben’s “The Interaction of Artists and Scientists in the Renaissance”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s Professor Joseph Dauben’s “The Interaction of Artists and Scientists in the Renaissance” (PDF)

      Also Available in: HTML

      Instructions: Please read this article to get a sense for the impact that science had on art during the Renaissance, especially during the sixteenth century. 

      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License 3.0. It is attributed to Smart History and the original version can be found here.

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Carmen Bambach’s “Anatomy in the Renaissance”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Carmen Bambach’s “Anatomy in the Renaissance” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above article that discusses how Renaissance artists, especially those of the High Renaissance, became knowledgeable about human anatomy. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the artworks and their captions.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.1.4 The Artist/Vasari’s “Lives of the Artists”  

    • Reading: The Saylor Foundation: Selections from Giorgio Vasari’s Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors and Architects, Volumes 1 and 2

      Link: The Saylor Foundation: Selections from Giorgio Vasari’s "Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors and Architects" (PDF) Volumes 1 and 2.

      Also available in:

      HTML (Volume 1)
      HTML (Volume 2)
      Google Books (Volume 1)

      Instructions: Please go to the link above. Read the following passages from Volume 1: “Dedications to Cosimo de Medici,” “The Author’s Preface to the Whole Work,” “Giovanni Cimabue,” “Niccola and Giovanni of Pisa,” “Giotto,” and “Ambrogio Lorenzetti.” Then, from Volume 2, please read: “Duccio,” “Paolo Ucello,” “Lorenzo Ghiberti,” “Masolino Da Panicale,” “Masaccio,” “Filippo Brunelleschi,” and “Donato.” Only the aforementioned passages have been included in the PDF link; if you are interested in reading about the other eminent painters, sculptors and architects included in Vasari's book follow the links to the HTML or Kindle versions. 

      Giorgio Vasari’s Lives is a collection of biographies of artists that was written in the 16th century through the eyes of Giorgio Vasari. It is a revealing document on the artists studied themselves, as well as on the changing role of the artist in society and the values by which they were judged in sixteenth century Italy. Try to get a sense of the life of an artist during the Renaissance as well as the values that govern Vasari’s depiction of the artists.

      Terms of Use: This reading is in the public domain. 

  • 3.2 Leonardo da Vinci  

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s “High Renaissance”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “High Renaissance” (HTML)

      Also Available in: HTML

      Instructions: Please read this short article explaining the phenomenon of the “High Renaissance” and its modes of expression.
       
      Terms of Use: The article above is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License 3.0 (HTML). It is attributed to Smart History and the original version can be found here (HTML). 

  • 3.2.1 Da Vinci’s Itinerary  

    • Reading: The Open University: The OpenLearn Team’s “Leonardo’s Life: A Timeline of Genius”

      Link: The Open University: The OpenLearn Team’s “Leonardo’s Life: A Timeline of Genius” (PDF)

      Also Available in: HTML

      Instructions: Please read this article that presents the timeline of Leonardo da Vinci’s life.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license. It is attributed to The Open University and the original version can be found here (HTML).

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Leonardo Da Vinci: Renaissance Artist” and “Leonardo da Vinci”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Leonardo da Vinci: Renaissance Artist” (YouTube) and “Leonardo da Vinci” (PDF)

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 13 minutes) and read the accompanying article. In this video, speakers Dr. David Drogin and Dr. Beth Harris explore the ways in which Leonardo worked in the context of Renaissance workshops, while the article discusses his biography.  

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License. It is attributed to SmartHistory. The original version can be found here.

    • Reading: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “An Introduction to the Art of Leonardo”

      Link: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “An Introduction to the Art of Leonardo” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please go to the webpage linked above. Please read the article “Baldwin, Leonardo, an Introduction” to get a sense for the many aspects of Leonardo’s distinctiveness as an artist and mind. 

      Terms of Use: The resource above is hosted with the kind permission of Robert Baldwin. You can view his original document on his site here.

  • 3.2.2 The “Virgin of the Rocks”  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Leonardo’s Virgin of the Rocks” and “Leonardo's Virgin of the Rocks Article”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Leonardo’s Virgin of the Rocks” (YouTube) and “Leonardo's Virgin of the Rocks Article” (PDF)

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 6 minutes) with speakers Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris. Also, read this article, which treats Leonardo’s Virgin of the Rocks in the context of Da Vinci’s style, interests and sensibilities as well as in the context of the High Renaissance style.  
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License. It is attributed to SmartHistory. The original version can be found here.

  • 3.2.3 The “Mona Lisa”  

  • 3.2.4 The “Last Supper”  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Leonardo’s Last Supper” and “Leonardo's Last Supper Article”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Leonardo’s Last Supper” (YouTube) and “Leonardo's Last Supper Article” (PDF)

      Instructions: Watch this video (12:32 minutes). In this video, Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris discuss Leonardo’s Last Supper. Also, read the accompanying article. Take notes on how it relates to the specific locality for which it was created, as well as on Leonardo’s formal choices and how they relate to the subject-matter of the painting.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike license. It is attributed to SmartHistory. The original version can be found here.

  • 3.2.5 “La Bella Principessa”  

  • 3.3 Michelangelo  

    • Reading: Connexions: John Freed’s “Medieval to Early Modern Cultural Paradigm Shift”

      Link: Connexions: John Freed’s “Medieval to Early Modern Cultural Paradigm Shift” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML and Epub

      Instructions: Please read this article discussing the shift between the Medieval and early Modern view of the world and how this shift is exemplified by Michelangelo’s representation of David.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed by John Freed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the condition that you correctly attribute it. It is attributed to John Freed and the original version can be found here (HTML).

  • 3.3.1 Michelangelo: A Sculptor’s Itinerary  

  • 3.3.2 The “Pietà”  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo’s Pietà” and "Michelangelo's Early Work"

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo’s Pietà” (YouTube) and "Michelangelo's Early Work" (YouTube).

      Instructions: Watch these two videos (about 15 minutes total). In these videos, speakers Dr. David Drogin and Dr. Beth Harris discuss one of Michelangelo’s early sculptures. Take notes on the visual elements of design as well as the work's composition and how they relate to the content of the work.
             
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike license.

  • 3.3.3 Michelangelo’s “David”  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo’s David” and Michelangelo's David Article”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo’s David” (YouTube) and “Michelangelo's David Article” (PDF)

      Instructions: Watch this video with speaker Dr. David Drogin and read this article, both of which discuss Michelangelo’s David. Take notes on the meaning of the iconography of David for the city of Florence and the Medici family. Also, take notes on how Michelangelo’s sculpture compares to previous representations discussed in the video. 
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License. It is attributed to SmartHistory. The original version can be found here.

  • 3.3.4 Michelangelo’s “Moses”  

  • 3.3.5 The Sistine Chapel Ceiling  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo, Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, 1508 - 1512”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo, Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, 1508 - 1512” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video discussing Michelangelo’s paintings of the Sistine Chapel ceiling (about 22 minutes). Make sure to take notes on discussion of papal commissions within sixteenth century culture, the technical aspect of Michelangelo’s endeavor, the iconographical aspect of the painted cycle, the way Michelangelo treats the human body, as well as how time is implied through the painted cycle.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 3.3.6 The “Last Judgment”  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo, Last Judgment, Sistine Chapel Ceiling, 1628 - 1629”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo, Last Judgment, Sistine Chapel Ceiling, 1628 - 1629” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 18 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris discuss Michelangelo’s Last Judgment painting, another papal commission for the Sistine Chapel. Pay careful attention to mention of the context of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation in which the painting was made. Also, take notes on the way in which the figures, their bodies, and their emotions are represented, as well as how this manner of representation contrasts with that of the paintings on the Sistine Chapel ceiling.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 3.4 Raphael  

  • 3.4.1 Raphael’s Itinerary  

    • Reading: The National Gallery: “Raphael”

      Link: The National Gallery: “Raphael” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this short biography of Raphael and click on the images on the page’s lower pane, in the “Related Images” section, to view them and read about them.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.4.2 Raphael’s “Alba Madonna”  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Raphael, Alba Madonna, c. 1510” and “Raphael's Alba Madonna Article”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Raphael, Alba Madonna, c. 1510” (YouTube) and “Raphael's Alba Madonna, Article” (PDF)

      Instructions: Read the brief article, and watch this short video (about 6 minutes) with speakers Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker discussing Raphael’s Alba Madonna. Take notes on Raphael’s style. Also, reflect on the manner by which he chose to treat his chosen subject matter.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License. It is attributed to SmartHistory. The original version can be found here.

  • 3.4.3 Raphael in Rome  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Raphael, Portrait of Pope Julius II, 1511”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Raphael, Portrait of Pope Julius II, 1511” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this short video (about 4 minutes) in which Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris discuss Raphael’s Portrait of Pope Julius II. How does he choose to represent the pope? Take notes on the formal and iconographical details of the piece.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike license.

  • 3.4.4 Raphael’s “School of Athens”  

    • Reading: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Papal Politics and Raphael’s Stanza della Segnatura as Papal Golden Age”

      Link: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Papal Politics and Raphael’s Stanza della Segantura as Papal Golden Age” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please go to the webpage linked above. Please read the article “Baldwin, Raphael’s Stanza della Segnatura and Papal Politics.” The article discusses three frescos by Raphael commissioned by Pope Julius II for a room used as a library in the papal apartments. Please take notes on the way in which the form and iconography of the three frescos reveal meaning when viewed as one iconographical program and within their specific historic context. Please view the images of the frescos, linked below, when reading Robert Baldwin’s article.

      Terms of Use: The resource above is hosted with the kind permission of Robert Baldwin. You can view his original document on his site here.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Raphael’s School of Athens”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Raphael’s School of Athens” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video (12:29 minutes) in which Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris discuss Raphael’s School of Athens. Read the text below the video. Take notes on the subject-matter, symbolism and figures. Also, take notes on the elements of Raphael’s style as well as how his style typifies the High Renaissance.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Stanford University: Timothy Verdon’s “Pagans in the Church: Raphael’s School of Athens and Renaissance Cross-Cultural Dialogue”

      Link: iTunes U: Stanford University: Timothy Verdon’s “Pagans in the Church: Raphael’s School of Athens and Renaissance Cross-Cultural Dialogue” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: Please go to track 1 of this series entitled “Pagans in the Church: Raphael’s School of Athens and Renaissance Cross-Cultural Dialogue” and click on “View in iTunes.” Please watch this lecture, which explores the iconography of Raphael’s fresco in the context of the larger iconographic program of the pope’s library in which it was painted, in its entirety (about 1 hour and 7 minutes).

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright of the lecture above.

    • Web Media: Raphael’s Stanza della Segnatura: 1. "Disputa", 2. "School of Athens", 3. "Parnassus"

      Links: Raphael’s Stanza della Segnatura: 1. "Disputa",

      1. "School of Athens", 3. "Parnassus" (PDF)

      Instructions: Please view the images above while reading Robert Baldwin’s article on the “Stanze della Segnatura.”

      Terms of Use: These images are in the public domain.

  • 3.5 The Influence of the Masters on Sixteenth Century Art  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Andrea Bayer’s “Sixteenth-Century Painting in Lombardy”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Andrea Bayer’s “Sixteenth-Century Painting in Lombardy” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article for information on painting in Lombardy in the 16th century. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the images and their captions. Take careful notes on mention of Leonardo da Vinci’s influence. Lastly, make sure to click on the links embedded within the text.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Andrea Bayer’s “Northern Italian Renaissance Painting”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Andrea Bayer’s “Northern Italian Renaissance Painting” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above article for information on painting in Northern Italy during the late 15th and sixteenth century. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the images and their captions. Lastly, make sure to click on the links embedded within the text.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.6 Venetian Masters of Painting in the Sixteenth Century  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Andrea Bayer’s “Sixteenth-Century Painting in Venice and the Veneto”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Sixteenth-Century Painting in Venice and the Veneto” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article to get a sense of the important characteristics and figures of sixteenth century Venetian painting.  Please also go to the links provided within the text, click on the thumbnail images located above the text, and view the images and their captions.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the web page above.

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Jean Sorabella’s “Venetian Color and Florentine Design”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Jean Sorabella’s “Venetian Color and Florentine Design” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the article to get a sense for the general characteristics differentiating Venetian Renaissance painting from Florentine Renaissance painting. Please click on the links embedded within the text. Also, click on the thumbnail images located above the text, and view the images and their captions.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the web page above.

  • 3.6.1 Bellini  

    • Reading: The National Gallery: “Giovanni Bellini”

      Link: The National Gallery: “Giovanni Bellini” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this short biography of the Venetian painter Giovanni Bellini (you will already have viewed a video discussing his “Saint Francis” in subunit 2.5.6.) Then, scroll down and click on the thumbnail images to view them and read the accompanying text.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above. 

  • 3.6.2 Giorgione  

    • Reading: The National Gallery: “Giorgione”

      Link: The National Gallery: “Giorgione” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this short biography of Giorgione and click on the images on the page’s lower pane to view them and read about them.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Giorgione and the High Renaissance in Venice”

      Link: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Giorgione and the High Renaissance in Venice” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read the article entitled “Overview.” Then, click on “Start Tour” and “Continue Tour” (at the bottom of each webpage) to view the images and read the corresponding text. Alternatively, to access this material you may click on the individual thumbnails for each image.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.6.3 Titian  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of European Paintings’ “Titian (1488-1576)”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of European Paintings’ “Titian (1488-1576)” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article discussing the important Venetian painter Titian. Please click on the links embedded within the text, particularly when they link to artworks by Titian. Also, click on the thumbnail images located above the text, and view the images and their captions.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Titian and the Late Renaissance in Venice”

      Link: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Titian and the Late Renaissance in Venice” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read the article entitled “Overview.” Then, click on “Start Tour” and “Continue Tour” (at the bottom of each webpage) to view the images and read the corresponding text. Alternatively, to access this material you may click on the individual thumbnails for each image.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Feast of the Gods”

      Link: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Feast of the Gods” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read the article entitled “Overview.” Then, click on “Start Tour” and “Continue Tour” (at the bottom of each webpage) to view the images and read the corresponding text. Alternatively, to access this material you may click on the individual thumbnails for each image.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Bellini and Titian, Feast of the Gods, 1514 and 1529”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Bellini and Titian, Feast of the Gods, 1514 and 1529” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this short video (about 3 minutes) in which Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker discuss The Feast of the Gods by Bellini and Titian.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Reading: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Titian, Assumption of the Virgin, S. Maria dei Frari, 1516–18”

      Link: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Titian, Assumption of the Virgin, S. Maria dei Frari, 1516–18” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please go to the webpage linked above. Please read the article “Baldwin, Titian’s Assumption of the Virgin in the Frari.” The article discusses an altarpiece made by Titian for the Basilica of Santa Maria dei Frari. The author explores the context of its commission as well as its meaning. Please view the image of the painting, linked below, when reading Robert Baldwin’s article.

      Terms of Use: The resource above is hosted with the kind permission of Robert Baldwin. You can view his original document on his site here.

    • Web Media: Titian’s Assumption of the Virgin

      Link: Titian’s Assumption of the Virgin (PDF)

      Instructions: Please view the image above while reading Robert Baldwin’s article on Titian’s Assumption of the Virgin.

      Terms of Use: This image is in the public domain.

  • 3.6.4 Veronese  

    • Reading: The National Gallery: “Veronese”

      Link: The National Gallery: “Veronese” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this short biography of Veronese and click on the images on the page’s lower pane to view them and read about them.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.7 Roman Architecture of the Sixteenth Century  

  • 3.7.1 Bramante  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Saint Peters Basilica, Vatican City, begun 1506, completed 1626”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Saint Peters Basilica, Vatican City, begun 1506, completed 1626” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video (4:27 minutes) in which Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker discuss Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome, Bramante’s original ideas, as well as Michelangelo’s contribution.
                
      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Web Media: Bluffton University: Mary Ann Sullivan’s “Index of Art Historical Sites: Rome, Italy: Tempietto, San Pietro in Montorio”

      Link: Bluffton University: Mary Ann Sullivan’s “Index of Art Historical Sites: Rome, Italy: Tempietto, San Pietro in Montorio” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please carefully view all the images of Bramante’s Tempietto and read Mary Ann Sullivan’s text. 

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by Mary Ann Sullivan. It can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).

  • 3.7.2 Michelangelo  

    • Reading: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo’s Tomb of Julius II”

      Link: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo's Tomb of Julius II” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Instructions: Read this PDF.  This reading should take approximately 20 minutes.

      Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Robert Baldwin, and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML). Please note that this material

      is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

    • Reading: Fordham University’s Giorgio Vasari: “Life of Michelangelo” from Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects

       Link: Fordham University’s Giorgio Vasari: Lives of the Most Eminent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects: “Life of Michelangelo” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the linked page for a biography of Michelangelo, written by a Renaissance artist named Giorgio Vasari. Read the selection also for a survey of some of Michelangelo’s most important projects. Pay particular attention to the persona and legend of Michelangelo that Vasari discussed, keeping in mind that while Vasari’s book is an invaluable primary source, it also is effected by the author’s bias. This reading should take approximately 45 minutes.  

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo’s Baccus and Roman Pieta”

      Link: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo's Bacchus and Roman Pieta”(PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Instructions: Read this PDF.  This reading should take approximately 45 minutes.

      Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Robert Baldwin, and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML). Please note that this material

      is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

    • Reading: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo’s David”

      Link: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo's David” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Instructions: Read this PDF.  This reading should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Robert Baldwin, and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML). Please note that this material

      is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

    • Reading: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel”

      Link: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Instructions: Read this PDF.  This reading should take approximately 45 minutes.

      Terms of Use: Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Robert Baldwin, and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML). Please note that this material

      is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

    • Reading: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo’s Last Judgment”

      Link: Professor Robert Baldwin, Associate Professor of Art History, Connecticut College, Social History of Art: “Michelangelo's Last Judgment” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Instructions: Read this PDF.  This reading should take approximately 15 minutes.

      Terms of Use: The linked material above has been reposted by the kind permission of Robert Baldwin, and can be viewed in its original form here (HTML). Please note that this material

      is under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any capacity without explicit permission from the copyright holder.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo, Laurentian Library, 1524 - 1571”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Michelangelo, Laurentian Library, 1524 - 1571” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch the video (7:58) for a discussion of one of Michelangelo’s architectural projects, the Laurentian Library.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Web Media: Oxford University’s History of Art: Professor Leonard Barkin’s “Michelangelo: A Life on Paper”

      Link: Oxford University’s History of Art: Professor Leonard Barkin’s “Michelangelo: A Life on Paper” (Itunes U)

      Instructions: Please follow the link and find 1. Michelangelo: A Life on Paper. Click on “View in ITunes” to listen to the lecture (44:58).

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.7.3 Vignola  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Il Gesu, Rome, consecrated 1584”

       Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Il Gesu, Rome, consecrated 1584” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch the video (8:08 minutes) for a discussion of Vignola’s most important project, the Gesu in Rome, the central church of the Jesuits, a significant order of the Catholic Church beginning in the sixteenth century. 

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 3.8 Venetian Architecture of the Sixteenth Century  

    • Reading: RIBA’s architecture.com: “Venetian Architecture”

      Link: RIBA’s architecture.com: “Venetian Architecture” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please follow the link to complete the introductory reading on architecture in Venice during the Renaissance. Click on all of the various topics for a more complete discussion of Venetian buildings. This reading should take approximately 45 minutes.  

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 3.8.1 Sanmicheli  

  • 3.8.2 Sansovino  

    • Reading: University of Mary Washington Blog: “The Myth of Venice in the Architecture of Jacopo Sansovino”

      Link: University of Mary Washington Blog: “The Myth of Venice in the Architecture of Jacopo Sansovino” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the first webpage titled “The Myth of Venice in the Architecture of Jacopo Sansovino” linked here. Then click on the links at the bottom of the entry to read through all of the following blog entries: Jacopo Sansovino, The Zecca, Libreria di San Marco, The Logetta, and The Renewed Piazzetta.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright of the webpage above.

  • 3.8.3 Palladio  

    • Reading: Center for Palladian Studies in America: “Palladio’s Life and World: A Timeline”

       Link: Center for Palladian Studies in America: “Palladio’s Life and World: A Timeline” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this timeline to get a sense for Palladio’s development, influences, and impact on Italian architecture. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio: Howard Burns’ “Andrea Palladio (1508-1580)

      Link: Centro Internazionale di Studi di Architettura Andrea Palladio: Howard Burns’ “Andrea Palladio (1508-1580)” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this overview of Andrea Palladio’s work and influence. As you read the article, go to the Image Index, to view images of Palladian structures. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.