Loading...

ARTH206: The Italian Proto-Renaissance To Mannerism

  • Unit 2: Art in the Quattrocentro  

    The “quattrocento” means “fifteenth century” in Italian. The word has become synonymous with the true blossoming of the Renaissance in Italy. In this unit, we will first take a look at the historical and cultural developments that shaped the material culture of this period. We will then, with special emphasis on the city of Florence, explore the ways in which Renaissance ideals became prominent in the art of fifteenth- century Italy.  

    Unit 2 Time Advisory

    This unit will take approximately 20 hours to complete.

    ☐ Subunit 2.1: 5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 2.2: 3 hours

    ☐ Subunit 2.3: 3 hours

    ☐ Subunit 2.4: 4 hours

    ☐ Subunit 2.5: 4 hours

    ☐ Subunit 2.6: 1 hour

    Unit2 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the importance of fifteenth-century Italy in the European phenomenon commonly called the “Renaissance.”
    • Identify the modes of expression of the Renaissance in the art of the fifteenth century in different regions of Italy.
    • Explain how specific historical contexts, events, and figures affected fifteenth-century Italian Renaissance art.
    • Recognize the individual style and interests of important artists of the fifteenth century.
    • Recognize important artworks of the quattrocento and describe them in terms of their form, content, and general history of their creation.
    • Assess the role of art and artists during the fifteenth century in Italy.
    • Discuss specific artistic techniques used during the fifteenth century in Italy.
  • 2.1 Italy and the Renaissance: The “Quattrocento”  

  • 2.1.1 The Renaissance  

    • Reading: Sam Houston State University: Lee M. Pappas and Nicholas C.J. Pappas’ “World History from the Renaissance to Imperialism, Lecture Notes”

      Link: Sam Houston State University: Lee M. Pappas and Nicholas C.J. Pappas’ “World History from the Renaissance to Imperialism, Lecture Notes” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the notes to lectures 3 and 4 to reassess the European phenomenon called the “Renaissance.” Take careful notes on Italy’s important place in the cultural changes that took place in the larger context of fifteenth-century Europe.         

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright of the webpage above.

  • 2.1.2 Timeline of the “Quattrocento”  

    • Reading: Jack E. Maxfield’s “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe: A.D. 1401 to 1500”

      Link: Jack E. Maxfield’s “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe: A.D. 1401 to 1500”  (PDF)

      Also available in:
      PDF and EPUB

      Instructions: Please read the passage treating Italy to get a sense for the historical context surrounding the artistic revolution of the “Quattrocento.” 

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed by Jack E. Maxfield under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the condition that you correctly attribute it.

  • 2.1.3 Antiquity in a Christian Society  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of European Paintings’ “The Rediscovery of Classical Antiquity”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of European Paintings’ “The Rediscovery of Classical Antiquity” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article. It discusses the renewed interest for the material culture of classical antiquity that became manifest during the fifteenth century in Italy. Also, make sure to click on the links embedded within the text. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the images and their captions. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Seton Hall University: Elizabeth Lev’s “The Great Renaissance Race: Pagan Antiquity Versus Christian Italy”

      Link: iTunes U: Seton Hall University: Elizabeth Lev’s “The Great Renaissance Race: Pagan Antiquity Versus Christian Italy” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U

      Instructions: If watching in iTunes scroll down to track 2 of this series, titled “The Great Renaissance Race: Pagan Antiquity Versus Christian Italy” and click on the hyperlink “View in iTunes.” View this video lecture in its entirety (1:04:25 minutes). Please take notes on the ways in which Renaissance artists incorporated pagan classical prototypes into a Christian view of the world and art.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.1.4 The City-State of Florence  

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: Florence in the Early Renaissance”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: “Florence in the Early Renaissance” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this short article, which focuses on the city-state of Florence as the cradle of the Renaissance.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 2.1.5 The Church  

    • Reading: University of Calgary: The Applied History Research Group’s “The End of Europe’s Middle Ages: The Church”

      Link: University of Calgary: The Applied History Research Group’s “The End of Europe’s Middle Ages: The Church” (HTML)

      Instructions: You will already have viewed this webpage and read the first three paragraphs.  This time around, please read paragraphs 4 through 6 of this article to get a sense for the big developments that took place in Italy and Europe within the Church during the fifteenth century.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Michael Norris’ “The Papacy during the Renaissance”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Michael Norris’ “The Papacy during the Renaissance” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article to get a sense for the developments within the papacy that took place during the fifteenth century as well as the impact these might have had on the artistic life of Italy.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.1.6 Humanism and Neo-Platonic Thought  

    • Reading: Hermetic.com: Washington State University: Richard Hooker’s “Renaissance Neo-Platonism”

      Link: Hermertic.com: Washington State University: Richard Hooker’s “Renaissance Neo-Platonism” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article for an understanding of the meaning of “neo-platonism” as well as for an introduction to the figure of Marsilio Ficino, an important representative of neo-platonism and an important figure in fifteenth-century Italy.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.1.7 Renaissance Art in Italy: An Overview  

    • Reading: The University of Colorado: James H. Beck’s “Renaissance Art and Architecture”

      Link: The University of Colorado: James H. Beck’s “Renaissance Art and Architecture” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this introduction to Renaissance art in Italy. Read only the following parts: “I. Introduction” and “II. The Renaissance in Italy: A. Early Renaissance Sculpture” and “Early Renaissance Painting.”

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.1.8 Linear Perspective in Art  

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: “Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: “Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this short article that discusses the rediscovery of linear perspective at the time of the Italian Renaissance.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org's Professor Joseph Dauben’s “How Brunelleschi ‘Discovered’ Linear Perspective” and "Linear Perspective, Brunelleschi's Experiment"

      Link: SmartHistory.org's Professor Joseph Dauben’s “How Brunelleschi ‘Discovered’ Linear Perspective” (PDF) and “Linear Perspective, Brunelleschi's Experiment” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Read this article and watch this short video (about 4 minutes). They discuss the experiments in linear perspective performed by Brunelleschi.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License. It is attributed to SmartHistory. The original version can be found here.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: Professor Joseph Dauben’s “Applications of Linear Perspective in the Renaissance”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: Professor Joseph Dauben’s “Applications of Linear Perspective in the Renaissance” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this short article, which discusses the use of linear perspective in the early Renaissance.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 2.2 Florence: Architecture  

  • 2.2.1 Brunelleschi and Alberti  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Architecture in Renaissance Italy”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Architecture in Renaissance Italy” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article through the passage on Alberti for an introduction to two important early Florentine architects. Also, please click on the links embedded in the text. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the images and their captions. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The Open University: The Renaissance Secrets Team’s “Riddle of the Dome—Transcript”

      Link: The Open University: The Renaissance Secrets Team’s “Riddle of the Dome—Transcript” (PDF)

      Also Available in: HTML

      Instructions: Please read this investigation into the construction of the Cathedral of Florence’s dome which signaled new Renaissance ideals and represented an extremely significant engineering accomplishment.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license. It is attributed to The Open University and the original version can be found here (HTML).

    • Reading: Miami University: “Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472)”

      Link: Miami University: “Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472)” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this introduction to Alberti’s architecture. Be sure to take notes on the specific structures and their characteristics.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use of the webpage above. 

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Architecture in Renaissance Italy”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: “Architecture in Renaissance Italy” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please follow the link to complete the introductory reading on architecture in Renaissance Italy and a brief discussion of Brunelleschi and Alberti, two important architects of the fifteenth century in Italy. This reading should take approximately 15 minutes.  

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: Arts and Facts’ “Brunelleschi’s Dome”

      Link: Arts and Facts’ “Brunelleschi's Dome” (I tunes U)

      Instructions: Please follow the link and find 7. Brunelleschi’s Dome. Click on “View in ITunes” to listen to the lecture (20:18).  

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.2.2 Michelozzo  

    • Reading: Mediateca di Palazzo Medici Riccardi: “Michelozzo (1435-1488)”

      Link: Mediateca di Palazzo Medici Riccardi: “Michelozzo (1435-1488)”  (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the biographical information on Michelozzo and view the images on the right pane of the page, particularly those of the Palazzo Medici-Riccardi.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: Bluffton University: Mary Ann Sullivan’s “Index of Art Historical Sites: Florence, Italy: Palazzo Medici-Riccardi”

      Link: Bluffton University: Mary Ann Sullivan’s “Index of Art Historical Sites: Florence, Italy: Palazzo Medici-Riccardi” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please carefully view all the images of Michelozzo’s Palazzo Medici-Riccardi, and read Mary Ann Sullivan’s text.

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by Mary Ann Sullivan. It can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).

    • Reading: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Private Palaces and the Roman Republican Style: Michelozzo’s Medici Palace, Florence, 1440–60”

      Link: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Private Palaces and the Roman Republican Style: Michelozzo’s Medici Palace, Florence, 1440–60” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please go to the webpage linked above. Please read the article “Baldwin, Michelozzo’s Medici Palace and the Burgher Republic.” The article discusses the Medici Palace built by Michelozzo. Please view the images of the palace, linked below, while reading the article.

      Terms of Use: The resource above is hosted with the kind permission of Robert Baldwin. You can view his original document on his site here.

    • Web Media: Image Guide: Medici Palace by Michelozzo

      Links: Image Guide: Medici Palace by Michelozzo (PDF)

      Instructions: Please view the images above while reading Robert Baldwin’s article on the Medici Palace by Michelozzo.

      Terms of Use: The images above are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivative License (HTML): you are free to share them under the condition that you attribute them correctly, that you do not use them for commercial purposes, and that you do not alter or build upon them.

  • 2.3 Florence: Sculpture  

  • 2.3.1 Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: The Sacrifice of Isaac  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org's: “Brunelleschi and Ghiberti, the Sacrifice of Isaac”

      Link: SmartHistory.org's: “Brunelleschi and Ghiberti, the Sacrifice of Isaac” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video, with speakers Dr. David Drogin and Dr. Beth Harris, in its entirety (about 11 minutes). You will be introduced to two reliefs that were made in the context of a competition, one by Brunelleschi and one by Ghiberti. This competition is often considered a significant turning point in the history of art, signaling new ideals. Take notes on the use of pictorial conventions and style as well as on the differences between the two representations.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 2.3.2 Donatello  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: James David Draper’s “Donatello (ca. 1386-1466)”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: James David Draper’s “Donatello (ca. 1386-1466)” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article discussing the sculptor Donatello. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the images and their captions. Lastly, make sure to go to the links embedded within the text.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.3.3 Donatello’s David  

    • Reading: Connexions: Albert Van Helden’s “The Medici Family”

      Link: Connexions: Albert Van Helden’s “The Medici Family” (PDF)

      Also available in:
      HTML and Epub

      Instructions: Please read this article on the powerful Medici family and go to any links provided by the author. Understanding the influence of the Medici family will help you understand what types of commissions Donatello and other artists were offered, including Donatello’s David.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed by Albert Van Helden under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the condition that you correctly attribute it.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: “Donatello’s David”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: “Donatello’s David” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this transcript of a conversation between Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker, discussing the importance of Donatello’s David.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org: “Contrapposto”

      Link: SmartHistory.org: “Contrapposto” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this short article discussing the “Contrapposto,” a position taken from ancient classical sculpture and used by Donatello for his David.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 2.3.4 Other Florentine Sculptors  

    • Web Media: The National Gallery of Art: “Florentine Sculpture in the 15th Century Overview”

      Link: The National Gallery of Art: “Florentine Sculpture in the 15th Century Overview” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read the article entitled “Overview.” Then, click on “Start Tour” and “Continue Tour” (at the bottom of each webpage) to view the images and read the corresponding text. Alternatively, to access this material you may click on the individual thumbnails for each image.  Make sure to take notes on the specifics of the artworks and the artists.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Nanni di Banco, Four Crowned Martyrs, 1412–15”

      Link: Robert Baldwin’s Social History of Art: “Nanni di Banco, Four Crowned Martyrs, 1412–15” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please go to the webpage linked above. Please read the article “Baldwin, Nanni di Banco’s Four Martyrs.” The article discusses an important sculpture by Florentine sculptor Nanni di Banco. Please take notes on the way in which its form and iconography reveal meaning when viewed within their specific historic context. Please view the image of the sculpture, linked below, while reading the article.

      Terms of Use: The resource above is hosted with the kind permission of Robert Baldwin. You can view his original document on his site here.

    • Web Media: Daniel Philpott’s Image of Nanni di Banco’s “Four Crowned Martyrs”

      Link: Daniel Philpott’s Image of Nanni di Banco’s “Four Martyrs” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please view the image above while reading Robert Baldwin’s article on Nanni di Banco’s “Four Crowned Martyrs.”

      Terms of Use: The image above is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (HTML): you are free to share and adapt it under the condition that you attribute it correctly.

  • 2.4 Florence: Painting  

    • Web Media: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: The Early Renaissance in Florence”

      Link: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: The Early Renaissance in Florence” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read the article entitled “Overview.” Then, click on “Start Tour” and “Continue Tour” (at the bottom of each webpage) to view the images and read the corresponding text. Alternatively, to access this material you may click on the individual thumbnails for each image. Take notes on the specifics of the artworks and the represented artists.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.4.1 Masaccio  

    • Reading: Dartmouth College: Paul Calter’s “Masaccio”

      Link: Dartmouth College: Paul Calter’s “Masaccio” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please scroll down the webpage until you reach the “Outline” and click on the hyperlink titled “Masaccio” to redirect you to that section of the webpage. Alternatively, you may scroll down the webpage (almost half way) until you reach the heading “Masaccio.” Please only read this short introduction to Masaccio, the painter often credited for revolutionizing two-dimensional representation in the 15th century. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the terms of use and copyright displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.4.2 Masaccio’s “Tribute Money”  

  • 2.4.3 Masaccio’s “Holy Trinity”  

  • 2.4.4 Fra Angelico  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Ross Finocchio’s “Fra Angelico (1395/1400-1455)”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Ross Finocchio’s “Fra Angelico (1395/1400-1455)” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above article, an introduction to the art of Fra Angelico.  Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the artworks and their corresponding captions.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.4.5 Fra Filippo Lippi  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Fra Filippo Lippi’s Madonna and Child”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Fra Filippo Lippi’s Madonna and Child” (YouTube) (HTML)

      Also available in:
      YouTube

      Instructions: Watch this brief video in its entirety (about 3 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris discuss Madonna and Child by Lippi. Take notes on the characteristics of the painting inspired by the Renaissance style of Masaccio and also on Lippi’s own personal style.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Lippi’s Portrait of a Man and a Woman at a Casement”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Lippi’s Portrait of a Man and a Woman at a Casement” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this brief video in its entirety (5:47 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. David Dorgin and Dr. Beth Harris focus on a portrait by Lippi. Take notes on the way it treats portraiture and how this treatment fits into the history of art.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Reading: SmartHistory.org’s “Fra Filippo Lippi”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Fra Filippo Lippi” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this article about Madonna and Child with Two Angels by Lippi, linking some of its characteristics to the changing status of the artists in 15th century Italy.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License (HTML): you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and that, in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 2.4.6 Piero della Francesca  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Piero della Francesca’s Portraits of Federico da Montefeltro and of Battista Sforza”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Piero della Francesca’s Portraits of Federico da Montefeltro and of Battista Sforza” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this short video in its entirety (5:29 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. Beth Harris and Chad Laird discuss a double portrait by Piero della Francesca. Take careful notes on the conventions by which the sitters are being represented, what della Francesca is emphasizing, as well as the social implications of such a portrait. Also, take notes on the use of atmospheric perspective.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 2.4.7 Sandro Botticelli  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Botticelli’s Birth of Venus”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Botticelli, The Birth of Venus, 1483-85” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this brief video in its entirety (about 5 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. Beth Harris and Chad Laird discuss a painting by Botticelli. Take careful notes on the topics of Botticelli’s sources of inspiration, the female nude, and neo-platonic ideals. Also, take notes on the characteristics that distinguish Botticelli’s style from Masaccio’s style.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 2.5 Some Examples from Venice and Northern Italy  

  • 2.5.1 Architecture: Venice  

    • Reading: Royal Institute of British Architects: “Palladio and the Veneto: Venetian Gothic”

      Link: Royal Institute of British Architects: “Palladio and the Veneto: Venetian Gothic” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this short introduction to Venetian architecture of the 15th century. Take notes on the distinctive influences that differentiate it from Florentine architecture in the same period.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.5.2 Painting: Venice  

    • Web Media: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Venetian Painting in the Early Renaissance”

      Link: The National Gallery of Art: “Tour: Venetian Painting in the Early Renaissance” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read the article entitled “Overview.” Then, click on “Start Tour” and “Continue Tour” (at the bottom of each webpage) to view the images and read the corresponding text. Alternatively, to access this material you may click on the individual thumbnails for each image. Make sure to take notes on the specifics of the artworks and the represented artists. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.5.3 Painting: Mantegna  

    • Lecture: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Keith Christiansen’s “The Genius of Andrea Mantegna”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Keith Christiansen’s “The Genius of Andrea Mantegna” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      iTunes U

      Instructions: Please view the video in its entirety (about 1:12 hours).  As you watch, take notes on the characteristics of Mantegna’s style as well as the ways in which the Renaissance is represented through his work.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Camera Degli Sposi”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Camera Degli Sposi” (YouTube) 

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 8 minutes). In this video, Dr. David Drogin and Dr. Beth Harris discuss a fresco painting by Mantegna. Take careful notes on the social and historical context of creation of this fresco, its illusionistic qualities, the references it makes to classical antiquity, its specific subject-matter, as well as some of its playful and humorous aspects.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Mantegna’s Saint Sebastian”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Mantegna’s Saint Sebastian” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 5 minutes). In this video, Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris discuss a painting by Mantegna. Take careful notes on the way the human body of the saint is represented and how reference to ancient classical antiquity is being made in the context of a Christian subject. Pay attention to discussion of perspective and realistic detail as well.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Mantegna’s Dead Christ”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Mantegna’s Dead Christ” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 5 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. Steven Zucker, Isaac Peterson, and Dr. Beth Harris discuss a painting by Mantegna showing a dramatic use of foreshortening and unique sense of space. Also, pay attention to discussion of the “Venetian” stylistic aspect of the painting, its humanistic character as well as how it could have spoken to a contemporary audience. 

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.

  • 2.5.4 Painting: Antonello da Messina  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Keith Christiansen’s “Antonello da Messina (1430-1479)”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Keith Christiansen’s “Antonello da Messina (1430-1479)” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above article, an introduction to the art of Antonello da Messina. Please also click on the thumbnail images located above the text and view the artworks and their corresponding captions. Make sure to go to the links embedded within the text when they are links to images of artworks.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 2.5.5 Painting: Bellini  

    • Lecture: SmartHistory.org’s “Bellini’s Saint Francis”

      Link: SmartHistory.org’s “Bellini’s Saint Francis” (YouTube)

      Instructions: Watch this video (about 4 minutes). In this video, speakers Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris comment on a painting by Bellini. Take notes on the subject-matter of the painting as well as the style of the artist and his Venetian characteristics of style.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License.