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ARTH202: Art of Ancient Greece and Rome

  • Unit 4: Rome: Art of the Etruscans and the Roman Republic  

    The legendary origins of the city of Rome situate the city’s birth in the 8th century B.C., the era of “geometric art” in Greece. In the fifth century B.C., the Roman Republic was established. By this time, the Romans had gained influence over the Italian peninsula by conquering the most important civilization of its time and place: the Etruscan civilization. The Roman Republic’s art was influenced by Greek and Etruscan antecedents, but it took realism to new levels by emphasizing individual traits in the rendering of the human figure and face.  

    Unit 4 Time Advisory

    This unit will take approximately 18 hours to complete. 

    ☐ Subunit 4.1: 3 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.2: 2 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3: 14 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.1: 2 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.2: 1.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.3: 2.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.4: 0.5 hour

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.5: 1.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.6: 1.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.7: 2.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 4.3.8: 1 hour

    Unit4 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, the student will be able to:

    • Trace the general timeline of the Etruscan civilization and the Roman Republic.
    • Explain how important historical developments and social-historical contexts had an impact on the evolution of Etruscan art and the art of the Roman Republic.
    • Link important historical and artistic developments of the Etruscans and the Roman Republic to specific geographical contexts.
    • Identify the important stylistic and technical developments of Etruscan art and the art of the Roman Republic.
    • Recognize and discuss important artworks from the Roman Republic.
  • 4.1 The Etruscans  

  • 4.1.1 The Etruscan Civilization  

    • Reading: Connexions: Jack E. Maxfield’s “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe, 1000 to 701 B.C.: Southern Europe: Italy,” “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe, 700 to 601 B.C.: Southern Europe: Italy,” “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe, 600 to 501 B.C.: Southern Europe: Italy”

      Link: Connexions: Jack E. Maxfield’s “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe: 1000 to 701 B.C.: Southern Europe: Italy,” (HTML) “A Comprehensive Outline of World History: Europe, 700 to 601 B.C.: Southern Europe: Italy,” (HTML) and “Europe, 600 to 501 B.C.: Southern Europe: Italy” (HTML)

      Also available in: (1000 to 701 B.C.)

      PDF

      Also available in: (700 to 601 B.C.)

      PDF

      Also available in: (600 to 501 B.C.)

      PDF

      Instructions: You already viewed these webpages at an earlier stage of this course. Though it is recommended that you read the entirety of each page again to get a sense for parallel developments in Greece and Rome, focus especially on the “Italy” passages this time around. 

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed by Jack Maxfield under a Creative Commons Attribution License: you may share and adapt the work under the condition that you correctly attribute it.

    • Reading: University of Notre Dame: Professor Elizabeth Mazurek’s “The History of Ancient Rome: Etruscans and Greeks in Pre-Roman Italy, 8th to 5th Centuries B.C.E.”

      Link: University of Notre Dame: Professor Elizabeth Mazurek’s “The History of Ancient Rome: Etruscans and Greeks in Pre-Roman Italy, 8th to 5th Centuries B.C.E.” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read these lecture notes and view the photographs and reconstructions.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 4.1.2 Etruscan Art  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Colette Hemingway and Séan Hemingway’s “Etruscan Art”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art: Colette Hemingway and Séan Hemingway’s “Etruscan Art” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article, and view the images that accompany it by clicking on the thumbnail images above the text. Read the articles that accompany the slides, and familiarize yourself with the artworks, their style, and their content. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Montgomery County Community College: Maggie Hobson Baker’s “The Etruscans”

      Link: iTunes U: Montgomery County Community College: Maggie Hobson Baker’s “The Etruscans” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: This recording is available through iTunes and is part of a series of recordings for Maggie Hobson Baker’s course on art from prehistoric times to the Renaissance taught at Montgomery County Community College. Please scroll down to track 7 of this series, titled “The Etruscans” and view the entire lecture (32 minutes).

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.2 Rome and Its Origins  

    • Lecture: YouTube: Yale University: Diana Kleiner’s “Roman Architecture: Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy”

       Link: YouTube: Yale University: Diana Kleiner’s “Roman Architecture: Beginnings of Urbanism in Italy” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      HTML (Transcript)

      Mp3
      iTunes U

      Instructions: Please take notes while listening to and watching this lecture on the founding of Rome and the beginnings of urbanism in Italy. This video should take approximately 1 hour and 14 minutes to view.

      This lecture is made available through Open Yale Courses, a series of open, free lectures by Yale Faculty.

      Terms of Use: Diana Kleiner, Roman Architecture, (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), http://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed March 7, 2011) License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0. The original version can be found here.

  • 4.3 Roman Art in the Republican Period: 509 B.C. through 27 B.C.  

  • 4.3.1 Historical Background  

  • 4.3.2 The Republic  

    • Reading: University of Notre Dame: Professor Elizabeth Mazurek’s “The History of Ancient Rome: The Early Roman Republic: The Struggle of the Orders”

      Link: University of Notre Dame: Professor Elizabeth Mazurek’s “The History of Ancient Rome: The Early Roman Republic: The Struggle of the Orders” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read these lecture notes and view the links provided.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike License: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 4.3.3 Art in the Roman Republic  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of Roman and Greek Art’s “The Roman Republic”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of Roman and Greek Art’s “The Roman Republic” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article and view the images that accompany it by clicking on the thumbnail images located above the article.  Read the articles that accompany the visuals. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: Internet Archive: Sacramento State University: Francesca Tronchin’s “Republican Art” and The Saylor Foundation’s “Gallery for Subunit 4.3.3”

      Link: Internet Archive: Sacramento State University: Francesca Tronchin’s “Republican Art” (MP3) and The Saylor Foundation’s “Gallery for Subunit 4.3.3” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please go to the above webpage, and listen to Professor Tronchin’s lecture on Republican art. Because no visuals accompany the lecture, go to the gallery above, which is divided into five different sections, emulating the structure of Professor Tronchin’s course.

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-NonDerivs: you may share the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that you do not alter or build upon it.

  • 4.3.4 Greek and Etruscan Antecedents, Roman Innovations: The Temple of Portunus  

    • Web Media: YouTube: SmartHistory.org’s “Temple of Portunus”

      Link: YouTube: SmartHistory.org’s “Temple of Portunus” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      Adobe Flash

      Instructions: Please watch this 3-minute video on the Temple of Portunus, a Roman temple from the Republican Period. Take notes on the ways in which the temple takes Greek architecture as a model and identify its Etruscan characteristics. What combination of elements makes it “Roman”?

      Terms of Use: This open educational resource is licensed under a Creative Common Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike: you may share and adapt the work under the conditions that you correctly attribute it, that you do not use it for commercial purposes, and, that in the case you adapt and distribute it, you do so under a similar license.

  • 4.3.5 Building Innovations  

    • Lecture: Yale University: Diana Kleiner’s “Roman Architecture: Technology and Revolution in Roman Architecture”

       Link: Yale University: Diana Kleiner’s “Roman Architecture: Technology and Revolution in Roman Architecture” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Mp3
      iTunes U

      Instructions: Please listen to and watch this lecture on the building innovations introduced by the Romans as early as the Republican era. This video lecture should take approximately 1 hour and 11 minutes to view.

      This lecture is made available through Open Yale Courses, a series of open, free lectures by Yale faculty.

      Terms of Use: Diana Kleiner, Roman Architecture, (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), http://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed March 7, 2011) License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0. The original version can be found here.

  • 4.3.6 Sculpture: The Art of Portraiture  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Rosemarie Trentinella’s “Roman Portrait Sculpture: Republican through Constantinian”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Rosemarie Trentinella’s “Roman Portrait Sculpture: Republican through Constantinian” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this article, leaving out the two last paragraphs, which the course will address later. View the images that accompany this overview by clicking on the thumbnail images situated above the text. Read the articles that accompany the photographs of artworks made in the era of the Roman Republic. Do not read the articles accompanying the photographs of artworks made in the era of the Roman Empire.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 4.3.7 The First and Second Styles of Painting  

    • Web Media: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of Greek and Roman Art’s “Roman Painting”

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: The Department of Greek and Roman Art’s “Roman Painting” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the article’s first four paragraphs, and view the images in the first and second styles that accompany this overview by clicking on the thumbnail images situated above the text. Read the articles that accompany the slides to become familiar with the represented artworks, both in terms of style and content. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Lecture: YouTube: Yale University: Diana Kleiner’s “Roman Architecture: Early Roman Interior Decoration”

      Link: YouTube: Yale University: Diana Kleiner’s “Roman Architecture: Early Roman Interior Decoration” (YouTube)

      Also available in:
      HTML

      Mp3
      iTunes U

      Instructions: Please listen to and watch this lecture starting at the 37-minute mark (with the beginning of a discussion of interior decoration and painting).

      This lecture is made available through Open Yale Courses, a series of open, free lectures by Yale faculty.

      Terms of Use: Diana Kleiner, Roman Architecture, (Yale University: Open Yale Courses), http://oyc.yale.edu (Accessed March 7, 2011) License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA 3.0. The original version can be found here.

  • 4.3.8 Roman Villas and Their Art: From Republic to Empire  

    • Lecture: iTunes U: UMBC Humanities and Social Science Forum: “Pompeii and the Roman Villa Exhibiting Art and Culture around the Bay of Naples”

      Link: iTunes U: UMBC Humanities and Social Science Forum: “Pompeii and the Roman Villa Exhibiting Art and Culture around the Bay of Naples” (iTunes U)

      Instructions: This recording is available through iTunes and is part of a series of recordings in the humanities and social sciences held at UMBC.  Please scroll down to track 23 of this series, select “View in iTunes,” and watch the entire lecture (45 minutes).

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.