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ARTH201: Art of Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East

  • Unit 1: The Art of Ancient Egypt  

    This unit focuses on the art, architecture, and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the Early Dynastic (c. 3100-2650 BCE)through the Roman (30 BCE- 4th century CE) periods. It begins with an overview of the major characteristics of Egyptian art, mythology, and beliefs about the afterlife, and ancient Egyptian conceptions of kingship all of which remained amazingly stable for three millennia. The unit then focuses on major Egyptian monuments, tombs, and artistic developments, following the chronology established by the reign of Egyptian kings.

    After completing this unit, you will be able to identify the major characteristics of ancient Egyptian art and architecture and the most important ancient Egyptian monuments, tombs, and art objects. You will also be able to tell how famous sites, such as the Great Temple at Karnak, and more common objects, such as the thousands of coffins recovered from Egyptian tombs, can be used to examine ancient Egyptian history and culture.

    Unit 1 Time Advisory

    This unit will take you approximately 72 hours to complete.

    ☐ Subunit 1.1: 13.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.2: 4.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.3: 9 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.4: 4.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.5: 4.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.6: 4.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.7: 18 hours

    ☐ Guided Observation 1 [in Subunit 1.7]: 2-3 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.8: 4.5 hours

    ☐ Subunit 1.9: 9 hours

    Unit1 Learning Outcomes

    Upon successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:

    • Identify major ancient Egyptian architectural sites, monuments, and works of art.
    • Identify the general characteristics of ancient Egyptian art and recognize the names and characteristics of the major art historical time periods of each region.
    • Explain Egyptian cosmology, conceptions of the afterlife, and kingship, as well as their relationship to architectural sites, monuments, and works of art.
    • Describe how art and architecture can be used to understand the politics, history, and culture of ancient Egypt.
  • 1.1 Major Themes in Egyptian Art  

    • Reading: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s The Arts of Ancient Egypt: A Resource for Educators (PDF)

      Link: The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s The Arts of Ancient Egypt: A Resource for Educators (PDF)

      Instructions: Please note that this reading will cover the material you need to know for subunits 1.1.1-1.1.7. Please download this resource by clicking on the hyperlink labeled “Download the Resource (PDF)” at the bottom of the page.  Then, read the sections: “Summary of Ancient Egyptian History,” “Egyptian Art: Function,” “Egyptian Art: Form,” “Egyptian Art: Hieroglyphs,” and “Egyptian Art: Artists and Materials” on pages 7-57 of the PDF file. Please note that this resource also includes a useful glossary on pages 127-132, so you may consider saving the file.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.1.1 Overview of Egyptian History  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Summary of Ancient Egyptian History,” pp. 7–18.

  • 1.1.2 Function of Egyptian Art  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Egyptian Art: Function,” p. 19.

  • 1.1.3 Basic Characteristics of Egyptian Art  

    Note: *This subunit is also covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Egyptian Art: Form,” pp. 37–46.

    • Reading: Brooklyn Museum of Art: Signs of the Afterlife’s “Striking Poses”

      Link: Brooklyn Museum of Art: Signs of the Afterlife’s “Striking Poses” (HTML and Adobe Flash)

      Instructions: Read this webpage of the “Summary of This Activity” as an introduction to the most common poses found in Egyptian statuary. You may also click on “Enter Activity” for an interactive experience; please note that this web media requires Flash Player 6.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.1.4 Egyptian Mythology  

    Note: *This subunit is also covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Cycles of Life,” “The Role of the Gods,” “Common Forms of Major Deities,” and “Representation of Deities in Art,” pp. 19–27.

    • Web Media: The British Museum’s “Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt” and “Picture List”

      Link: The British Museum’s “Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt” (PDF) and “Picture List” (PDF)

      Instructions: Read the first page as an introduction to Ancient Egyptian deities. On the second page, click on each of the Egyptian gods and goddesses and read about each individual deity. Do you notice any commonalities in how they are depicted, the roles they perform, and/or their powers?

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. It can be viewed in its original form here and here (HTML).

  • 1.1.5 Egyptian View of the Afterlife  

    Note: *This subunit is also covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Life after Death,” pp. 27–29.

    • Web Media: BBC: Ancient History-in-Depth’s “The Mummy Maker”

      Link: BBC: Ancient History-in-Depth’s “The Mummy Maker” (Adobe Flash)

      Instructions: Please note that playing this game is optional. Prepare the body of a royal official for the afterlife by clicking on “Launch the game.” 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.1.6 Role of and Representation of the King and Queen in Egyptian Art  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Order Over Chaos: The Role of the King,” “The King in Art,” “The Queen,” “Symbols of Upper and Lower Egypt,” and “Royal Regalia of Ancient Egypt,” pp. 29–35.

  • 1.1.7 Hieroglyphs and Egyptian Art  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.1. Focus specifically on *“Hieroglyphics and Egyptian Art,” pp. 47–52.

  • 1.1.8 Egyptology  

    • Reading: The Saylor Foundation's “Egyptology”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

    • Reading: Theban Mapping Project’s “Becoming an Egyptologist”

      Link: Theban Mapping Project’s “Becoming an Egyptologist” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above webpage for basic information on how to become an Egyptologist.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.2 Art and Architecture of the Early Dynastic or Archaic Period (c. 3100-2650 BCE)  

  • 1.2.1 Overview of the Early Dynastic Period  

    • Reading: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “The Early Dynastic Period”

      Link: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “The Early Dynastic Period” and "Narmer Palette" (PDF)

      Instructions: Please note that this reading will cover the material you need to know for subunits 1.2.1 and 1.2.2. Please read both documents in full. This reading discusses some of the issues involved in which dynasties fall under the Early Dynastic or Old Kingdom periods. The Step Pyramids, created during the Third Dynasty (c. 2650 – 2575 BCE),are discussed in section 1.3.2.1 to provide a more coherent examination of the development of Egyptian pyramids.

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for noncommercial use by Jacques Kinnaer. It can be viewed in its original form here.

    • Lecture: iTunes U: Pennsylvania State University: College of Art and Architecture: Art History 111: Heather C. McCune Bruhn’s “Early Dynastic Egypt”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.2.2 The Narmer Palette  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.2.1. Focus specifically on *the “Narmer Palette” webpage.

  • 1.2.3 Hierakonpolis  

    • Reading: Archaeology’s Interactive Dig: Excavating Hierakonpolis: Renée Friedman’s “Narmer’s Temple: Introduction,” “Narmer’s Temple: Week 1,” “Narmer’s Temple: Week 2,” “Narmer’s Temple: Week 3,” and “Narmer’s Temple: Week 4”

      Links: Archaeology’s Interactive Dig: Excavating Hierakonpolis: Renée Friedman’s “Narmer’s Temple: Introduction,” “Narmer’s Temple: Week 1,” “Narmer’s Temple: Week 2,” “Narmer’s Temple: Week 3,” and “Narmer’s Temple: Week 4” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above webpages as an introduction to the archaeological excavations of Hierakonpolis, the largest Pre-Dynastic and Early Dynastic archaeological site in Egypt, and to get an idea of some of the day-to-day workings of an archaeological site. These webpages report some of the excavations at Hierakonpolis conducted in 2002 byDr. Renée Friedman. For coverage of what Dr. Friedman’s team has recovered more recently please visit Archaeology’s Interactive Dig: Hierakonpolis.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • 1.3 Art and Architecture of the Old Kingdom (c. 2650-2150 BCE)  

  • 1.3.1 Overview of the Old Kingdom Period  

    • Reading: The British Museum: Explore/Online Tours’s “Egypt in the Old Kingdom”

      Link: The British Museum: Explore/Online Tours’s “Egypt in the Old Kingdom” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read this text in its entirety. 

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. It can be viewed in its original form here (HTML).

    • Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “Old Kingdom Art and Architecture”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.3.2 The Pyramids  

    • Reading: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “Mastaba,” “Saqarra,” “Meidum,” “Dashar” and “Giza”

      Link: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site:  “Mastaba,” “Saqarra,” “Meidum,” “Dashar” and “Giza” (HTML)

      Instructions: While reading though the following pages, please open the resource below, The Saylor Foundation’s “ARTH201: Image Guide for Subunit 1.3.2” in a separate tab or window to look at the images associated with these readings.  First click on the link “A to Z,” then click on “M” on the alphabetical list at the top of the page, and finally click on “Mastaba.” Read the page about mastabas, the burial chambers of Old Kingdom civil servants. When you are finished, click on “Monuments” on the left side of the page and then click on “Saqarra.” Read the entire page, then click on the link “Djoser’s Step Pyramd” in the second paragraph. After reading this page, click on “Step Pyramid” in the box at the bottom of the page. Then once again click on “Monuments” on the left side of the page and then click on and read the following pages:  “Meidum,” “Dashar,” and “Giza.” After reading about Giza, click on “Pyramid of Cheops” at the bottom of the page and read this page as well. Finally, after reading this page, click on “Pyramid” at the bottom of the page and read this page in its entirety. These readings serve as an introduction to the development of pyramids in Ancient Egypt.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: The Saylor Foundation’s “ARTH201: Image Guide for Subunit 1.3.2”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.3.2.1 Step Pyramid of King Djoser at Saqqara  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.3.2. Focus specifically on *the “Djoser’s Step Pyramid” webpage.

  • 1.3.2.2 Meidum Pyramid  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.3.2. Focus specifically on *the “Meidum Pyramid” webpage.

  • 1.3.2.3 Bent Pyramid of Dashur  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.3.2. Focus specifically on the “Bent Pyramid of Dashur” webpage.*

  • 1.3.2.4 Pyramids at Giza and the Sphinx  

    Note: This subunit is also covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.3.2. Focus specifically on the “The Great Pyramid” and “Khaefre’s Pyramid and Sphinx” webpages.

    • Reading: BBC: Ancient History-in-Depth: Dr. Ian Shaw’s “Building the Great Pyramid” and Dr. Aidan Dodson’s “The Great Pyramid: Gateway to Eternity

      Links: BBC: Ancient History-in-Depth: Dr. Ian Shaw’s “Building the Great Pyramid” (HTML) and Dr. Aidan Dodson’s “The Great Pyramid: Gateway to Eternity” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above webpages as an introduction to how and why the Great Pyramids were built.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: PBS: Nova: The Pyramids: “Explore the Pyramids: Khufu”: “Enter Here”

      Link: PBS: Nova: The Pyramids: “Explore the Pyramids: Khufu”: “Enter Here” (HTML and Quicktime)

      Instructions: Follow the directions on the webpage. First, click on which part of the interior of Khufu’s Pyramid that you would like to explore on the pyramid’s blueprint. This will redirect you to a webpage for the part of the pyramid’s interior you chose. Read the text on this webpage. Then, continue exploring other parts of the pyramid’s interior. Please note you may need to download the QuickTime plugin.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: BBC: Ancient History-in-Depth’s “Pyramid Challenge”

      Link: BBC: Ancient History-in-Depth’s “Pyramid Challenge” (Adobe Flash)

      Instructions: Please note that playing this game is optional. Do you have what it takes to build an ancient pyramid? Click on “Launch this game,” and find out. 

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.3.2.5 Mastabas at Saqqara  

    Note: *This subunit is covered by the reading assigned beneath subunit 1.3.2. Focus specifically on *the “Mastaba Tomb, Saqqara” webpage.

  • 1.4 The First Intermediate Period (c.2150-2030 BCE)  

    • Reading: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “The First Intermediate Period”

      Link: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “The First Intermediate Period” (PDF)

      Instructions: Read this text as an introduction to the period between the Old and Middle Kingdoms. For HTML: On the sidebar click on “History” and then “First Intermediate Period.”

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for noncommercial use by Jacques Kinnaer. It can be viewed in its original form here.

    • Reading: The British Museum’s “Stela of Inheretnakht” and “Limestone Stela of Tjetji”

      Links: The British Museum’s “Stela of Inheretnakht” (PDF) and “Limestone Stela of Tjetji” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read these two webpages about examples of the First Intermediate Period Egyptian Art.

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. It can be viewed in its original form here (Stela of Inheretnakht) and here (Limestone of Stela of Tjeti).

    • Reading: Brooklyn Museum of Art: Signs of the Afterlife’s “Back in Time,” “Big Picture,” and “Behind the Scenes”

      Links: Brooklyn Museum of Art: Signs of the Afterlife’s “Back in Time,” (HTML and Adobe Flash) “Big Picture” (HTML and Adobe Flash) and “Behind the Scenes” (HTML and Adobe Flash)

      Instructions: Read these webpages for an in-depth look at and analysis of an Eleventh Dynasty funerary stele in the Brooklyn Museum of Art.  You may also click on “Enter Activity” for an interactive experience; please note that this web media requires Flash Player 6.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

    • Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation's "Art and Architecture of the First Intermediate Period"

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.5 Art and Architecture of the Middle Kingdom (c. 2040-1640 BCE)  

  • 1.5.1 Overview of the Middle Kingdom  

  • 1.5.2 Mentuhotep II’s Mortuary Complex and Related Tombs  

    • Reading: Tour Egypt: Mark Andrews’ “The Mortuary Temple of Mentuhotep II on the West Bank at Luxor”

      Link: Tour Egypt: Mark Andrews’ “The Mortuary Temple of Mentuhotep II on the West Bank at Luxor” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read this webpage as introduction to the mortuary complex of Mentuhotep II.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: The British Museum: Explore/Highlight’s “Model from the Tomb of Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II,” “Fragment of Painted Limestone Relief from the Tomb of Kemsit,” and “Limestone Relief Showing Mentuhotep II Embraced by Montu”

      Links: The British Museum: Explore/Highlights’ “Model from the Tomb of Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II,” “Fragment of Painted Limestone Relief from the Tomb of Kemsit,” and “Limestone Relief Showing Mentuhotep II Embraced by Montu” (All PDF)

      Instructions: Read each webpage about fragments of three different reliefs associated with the burial of Mentuhotep II.

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. It can be viewed in its original form here (Model from the Tomb of Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II), here (Fragment of Painted Limestone Relief from the Tomb of Kemsit) and here (Limestone Relief Showing Mentuhotep II Embraced by Montu) (HTML).

    • Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “Tomb of Meketre”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.5.3 Art and Architecture of the Twelfth Dynasty (1991-1783)  

    • Reading: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “The Twelfth Dynasty,” “El-Lisht,” “Hawara,” and “Illahun”

      Link: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: “The Twelfth Dynasty,” “El-Lisht,” “Hawara,” and “Illahun” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read the above text. For HTML: Please click on the above link.  On the sidebar, click on the links to “History,” then “Middle Kingdom,” and then “Twelfth Dynasty.”  Read the text on this webpage. After reading this text, click on the hyperlinks titled “El-Lisht,” “Hawara,” and “Illahun” in the “More” box at the end of the webpage. Read the text on each of these webpages as well. 

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for noncommercial use by Jacques Kinnaer. It can be viewed in its original form here.

  • 1.5.4 Tombs at Beni-Hassen  

    Note: *This subunit is covered in the lecture assigned beneath subunit 1.5.1. How do these tombs compare to the Old Kingdom tombs of officials buried at Saqqara?*

  • 1.6 Art and Architecture of the Second Intermediate Period (c.1640-1550 BCE)  

  • 1.7 Art and Architecture of the New Kingdom (c. 1550–1070 B.C.)  

  • 1.7.1 Overview of the New Kingdom  

  • 1.7.2 New Kingdom Temples  

    • Reading: The Saylor Foundation’s “New Kingdom Temples”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.7.2.1 Luxor Temple  

  • 1.7.2.2 Karnak  

    • Reading: Tour Egypt: Marie Parsons’ “Karnak”

      Link: Tour Egypt: Marie Parsons’ “Karnak” (HTML)
                
      Instructions: Please read this webpage as an introduction to the temple complex of Karnak.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: University of Memphis, Tennessee: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology: The Karnak Hypostyle Hall Project’s “Historical Background,” “Dimensions,” and “Function and Meaning of the Hypostyle Hall”

      Links: University of Memphis, Tennessee: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology: The Karnak Hypostyle Hall Project’s “Historical Background,” (HTML) “Dimensions,” (HTML) and “Function and Meaning of the Hypostyle Hall” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read these webpages about the Hypostyle Hall of Karnak. Make sure to click on “Next Page” until you are redirected to the main menu.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

    • Web Media: University of Memphis, Tennessee: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology: The Karnak Hypostyle Hall Project’s “A Historical Tour of the Hypostyle Hall”

      Link: University of Memphis, Tennessee: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology: The Karnak Hypostyle Hall Project’s “A Historical Tour of the Hypostyle Hall” (HTML)

      Instructions: Click on the above link. Then, “tour” the Hypostyle Hall of Karnak by clicking on each of the numbered hyperlinks.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.7.2.3 Abu Simbel  

    Note: *This subunit is covered in the lecture, “Ramses II and Late Egyptian Art,” assigned beneath subunit 1.7.1.*

  • 1.7.2.4 Mortuary Temples  

  • 1.7.2.4.1 Hatshepsut’s (1508–1458 BC) Mortuary Temple  

    • Reading: Tour Egypt: Marie Parsons’ “Deir-el Bahri”

      Link: Tour Egypt: Marie Parsons’ “Deir-el Bahri” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above webpage as an introduction to Eighteenth Dynasty construction at Deir-el Bahri and the Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Marie Parson’s “Deir el-Bahri, Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut”

      Link: Marie Parson’s “Deir el-Bahri, Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the above text about Hatshepsut’s mortuary temple paying close attention to the different reliefs that decorate the complex.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.7.2.4.2 The Memorial Temple of Seti I (1290/1294-1279 BCE) at Abydos  

    • Reading: Peter Rome’s “The Temple of Seti I and the Osireion at Abydos”

      Link: Peter Rome’s “The Temple of Seti I and the Osireion at Abydos” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this text as an introduction to the Temple of Seti I at Abydos.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.7.3 New Kingdom Tombs  

  • 1.7.3.1 The Valley of the Kings  

    • Reading: The British Museum’s “The Valley of the Kings,” “Faience shabti of Sety I,” “Gold earring of Tawosret,” and “Wooden statue from the tomb of Ramesses I”

      Links: The British Museum’s “The Valley of the Kings,” “Faience shabti of Sety I,” “Gold earring of Tawosret,” and “Wooden statue from the tomb of Ramesses I” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read the first article as an introduction to the Valley of the Kings, the New Kingdom royal necropolis. Then read the three following articles about objects from the Valley of the Kings in the collection of the British Museum.

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. They can be viewed in their original form here: “The Valley of the Kings,” “Faience shabti of Sety I,” “Gold earring of Tawosret,” and “Wooden statue from the tomb of Ramesses I” (HTML).

    • Web Media: Theban Mapping Project’s “Atlas of the Valley of the Kings”

      Link: Theban Mapping Project’s “Atlas of the Valley of the Kings” (Adobe Flash)

      Instructions: First, click “Start Movie.”  Watch the short movie about the Valley of the Kings. Then, run your cursor over the map and click on the different highlighted tombs.  Watch the short movies about the ones you are interested in. For further information about these tombs and more images click on link at the top labeled “Description.”

      Note on the Media: The Theban Mapping Project was started in 1978 and is now based at the American University in Cairo. The TMP believes that the first and most essential step in preserving Theban heritage is a detailed map and database of all of its archaeological, geological, and ethnographic features. For the past decade they have focused on creating 3-D computer models of the tombs in the Valley of the Kings.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpages above.

  • 1.7.3.2 The Tomb of Tutankhamun (Ruled c.1333 BC – 1323 BC)  

    Note: *This subunit is also covered in the lecture, “Amarna and Tutankhamun,” beneath subunit 1.7.1.*

    • Reading: The British Museum’s “Tutankhamun, King of Egypt (1336-1327 BC)” and “Granite statue of Tutankhamun as a priest of Hapy”

      Links: The British Museum’s “Tutankhamun, King of Egypt (1336-1327 BC)” and “Granite statue of Tutankhamun as a priest of Hapy” (PDF)

      Instructions: Please read the above two articles in their entirety to learn about the reign of Tutankhamun.

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. They can be viewed in their original form here: “Tutankhamun, King of Egypt (1336-1327 BC)” and “Granite statue of Tutankhamun as a priest of Hapy” (HTML).

    • Reading: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: Tutankhamun: The Mummy

      Links: Jacques Kinnaer’s The Ancient Egypt Site: Tutankhamun: The Mummy (HTML)
                
      Instructions: While reading though the following pages, please open the resource below, The Saylor Foundation’s “ARTH201: Image Guide for Subunit 1.7.3.2” in a separate tab or window to look at the images associated with this reading. First click on the link “From A to Z,” then click on “T” at the top of the page and finally, click on “Tutankhamun Mummy.” Read the entire text about the discovery and examination of the mummy of King Tutankhamun.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Web Media: The Saylor Foundation’s “ARTH201: Image Guide for Subunit 1.7.3.2”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

    • Web Media: The Saylor Foundation’s “Tutankhamun’s Tomb (Valley of the Kings KV62) and Its Contents”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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  • 1.7.3.3 Deir-el-Medina  

    • Reading: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Catharine H. Roehrig’s “An Artisan’s Tomb in New Kingdom Egypt”

      Link: Metropolitan Museum of Art: Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Catharine H. Roehrig’s “An Artisan’s Tomb in New Kingdom Egypt” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read the text about the tomb of a New Kingdom artisan at Deir-el Medina.  After you have read the text, click on “View Slideshow” to see related examples of New Kingdom art in the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.7.4 Art and Architecture of the Amarna Period (1353-1336 BCE)  

    Note: *This subunit is also covered in the lecture, “Amarna and Tutankhamun,” beneath subunit 1.7.1.*

  • Guided Observation #1  

    • Assessment: The Saylor Foundation's "Guided Observation 1: Ancient Egyptian Royal Portraiture"

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

      Submit Materials

  • 1.8 Art and Architecture of the Third Intermediate and Late Periods (1070 BCE- 4th century BCE)  

  • 1.9 Art and Architecture of the Ptolemaic and Roman Periods (332 BCE- 4th Century CE)  

    • Lecture: YouTube: The Saylor Foundation’s “Ptolemaic and Roman Period Art and Architecture”

      The Saylor Foundation does not yet have materials for this portion of the course. If you are interested in contributing your content to fill this gap or aware of a resource that could be used here, please submit it here.

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  • 1.9.1 Ptolemaic (332-30 BCE) and Roman Period (303BCE-4th Century CE) Art  

  • 1.9.2 Fayum Portraits  

    • Reading: The British Museum: A.J.N.W Prag’s “Proportion and Personality in the Fayum Portraits”

      Link: The British Museum: A.J.N.W Prag’s “Proportion and Personality in the Fayum Portraits” (PDF)

      Instructions: Read the entire article (7 pages with bibliography and images).

      Terms of Use: The material above has been reposted with permission for educational use by the British Museum. It can be viewed in its original form here.

  • 1.9.3 Ptolemaic and Roman Temples  

  • 1.9.3.1 Temple of Hathor at Dendera  

    • Reading: Tour Egypt: Mark Andrews’s “Dendera and the Temple of Hathor”

      Link: Tour Egypt: Mark Andrews’s “Dendera and the Temple of Hathor” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this text as an introduction to the Temple of Hathor at Dendera.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.9.3.2 Temple of Horus at Edfu  

    • Reading: University of Memphis: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology’s “Façade of the Temple of Horus at Edfu”

      Link: University of Memphis: Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology’s “Façade of the Temple of Horus at Edfu” (HTML)

      Instructions: Please read this short introduction to the Temple of Horus at Edfu.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

    • Reading: Bluffton College: Egypt Index: Mary Ann Sullivan’s “Temple of Horus at Edfu”

      Link: Bluffton College: Egypt Index: Mary Ann Sullivan’s “Temple of Horus at Edfu” (HTML)

      Instructions: Read this short text, and click on the pictures for larger views of the Temple of Horus at Edfu. Make sure to also click on the link at the bottom of the page to look at the pictures on the second page.

      Terms of Use: Please respect the copyright and terms of use displayed on the webpage above.

  • 1.9.3.3 Temple Complex at Philae